Saturday, December 27, 2014

Nancy Kaiser, Animal Communicator & Author


Archived interview.
Posted on Monday, June 11, 2012 2:29 PM

Since this article has posted, Nancy continues to write and has accumulated awards and accolades for her communication skills and penmanship. 
Congratulations Nancy on your great success! 


Nancy  Kaiser is an animal communicator, author and freelance writer.  In her first book, she draws on extensive experience to share her personal journey and anecdotes about the animals she has encountered along the way.  The result is a spiritually uplifting book that inspires all who truly care about animals or is drawn to the world of inter-species communication.

Where are you in the world?
I was born and raised in New Jersey, USA. My husband and I had an equine hospital and breeding farm in central New Jersey for 27 years. He retired in 2004, and we moved to the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina in the High Country. I live in Todd, which is just north of Boone with my two Labradors and a Swedish Warmblood horse.

Tell me about your writing and your book releases....
My husband walked out six weeks into construction of our retirement home. We separated and divorced in January 2005. I began writing a personal journal about a year later to understand how and why I was alone and 600 miles from everyone I knew without a home or a job. At the urging of friends who felt my writing could help others faced with traumatic life challenges, I turned my journal into my first book, Letting Go: An Ordinary Woman’s Extraordinary Journey of Healing & Transformation, which was published in June 2008. I released the book I’d always intended to write, Tales of an Animal Communicator ~ Master Teachers, in October 2011. This is the first of a series and shares the stories of the filly foal who taught me I was meant to be an animal communicator and healer and my personal animals. 

Where do you like to write?
I write in my office looking out at the woods that surround my home.

Do you write every day?
If I’m working on a book then I write daily if my communication and healing work allows me to. When I’m not working on a book then no, I don’t write daily. I write according to deadlines for articles I’m submitting, and my monthly column for Stable Woman Gazette -  Horse Tales & Teachers.

How do you maintain ideas and thoughts? 
I write what I live, so I access my memories. For me, writing is akin to channeling. My soul guides what needs to be expressed and shared. Of course, once it’s on the computer screen then my left brain does any editing and organizing that’s necessary.

Who is your niche market?
For Letting Go, my market is anyone that is struggling to learn and grown from significant life challenges; unexpected losses due to divorce or death. It will help those who want to learn from and release the pain of their trauma as easily and quickly as possible.

The market for Tales is anyone who loves animals. I’m confident that Tales will broaden people’s perspective on the significance of their animals in their life while helping them develop more meaningful relationships with not only their animals, but all animals.

Do you have a favorite author?
I really don’t have one favorite author. I chose books based on topic rather than author. I read mostly non-fiction, but anxiously awaited each new installment of Harry Potter. I have an extremely eclectic book collection.

What are your writing goals for future endeavors?
My next book, Tales of an Animal Communicator ~ Being A Clear Voice, will share the lessons taught by my clients’ animals. I know it will be created in perfect timing, perhaps 2013. For now, I’m focused on promoting the first in this series, so that the amazing lives and lessons of the animals that have made me the woman I am will be enjoyed by as many animal-lovers as possible. These remarkable souls have waited a long time for me to share their stories and I feel a responsibility to them. I want to be sure Tales finds all those interested in enriching their relationships with animals. 

Do you have suggestions for newbie writers?
Write for the “right” reasons for you. Write from your heart. Publish to contribute something of value to others not just to earn money. Surround yourself with professionals that respect your opinion regardless of your inexperience. Be open to constructive criticism and be willing to explore new possibilities and options. Remain true to your purpose and know that your heart knows best. Even if you never publish, the act of writing alone may be all you need. Writing healed me; publishing didn’t. But, know that the first time you hold your own book is magical and enormously satisfying. Each time you hear how your words have helped another, your heart warms and you smile. Those are the moments you’ll remember long after any money you’ve earned is spent.

Excerpt from 
Tales of an Animal Communicator: Master Teachers

I asked Bob what happened. What did they do to Love? Bob confessed they’d kind of forced and manhandled her, i.e., disrespected her. They’d tried to carry her. “Well, no wonder! Love needs to do it herself,” I declared. The breadth of her emotions continually amazed me. Love wanted so desperately to be independent. It broke my heart to know she never would be, but I couldn’t let her sense that from me. I’d learned early on how much she picked up from those around her. I wasn’t going to make that mistake again. 

I continued to encourage Love to be patient while I applied healing energy and waited for the stronger cart to arrive. Again, I don’t think I can stay much longer. Is your mission done? No, not really. Didn’t you come to teach me? Yes. Have I learned all I should? No. Did you come to teach others? Yes. Boots, Bob, Kathy, the other communicator, and my chiropractor. Have they learned everything? No. Could you please be patient with people and stay to help us? I’m trying, but I’m so sad and tired. I don’t know if I can make it. If I can’t get outside, I don’t want to live within four walls, no matter what. I spent longer than usual, flooding Love with healing energy, trying to heal her emotional state as well as her imperfect body. 

Boots called to say the filly seemed really alert, happy, and energized – very different from the last week or so. She said Love was lying down just like a normal foal would, with all four legs tucked underneath her. This was a momentous first. I asked Love what had changed. Excitedly, she confessed, I can feel things in both my hind legs that I’ve never felt before. My bad leg doesn’t bother me, because I know where it is now. Is it painful? No, it’s just sensations.

The new cart still wasn’t ready, so we went over with Bob’s cart. I sensed Love’s excitement. Bob wanted me to handle her head, because he knew I’d let Love do whatever she wanted to. This was her deal. We’re just there to support her. My promise had been kept as I helped her outside. She was amazing – flying as fast as she could to the grass to graze. I was ecstatic to finally see her out of her stall. 

We headed back in when Bob felt she’d done enough. Love cantered back in, breaking another wheel and bending the cart. She did it on her own. She had an amazingly strong will and endless determination. I was so proud of her, and of us. Bob said she was the most alert he’d seen her, with a very normal head and neck carriage; all were encouraging observations. She stayed up for quite a while – meaning she wasn’t too tired. I, on the other hand, was exhausted from her Herculean effort. 

Her short time out had her sweating and breathing like she’d run five miles. I told her I was appalled at how hard she had to work. I don’t mind. It’s my turn to work. You’ve been doing all the work ’til now. As I talked with her, I felt a buzz down both of my legs that I interpreted as the new sensations Love was feeling. I thought I’d be happier seeing her outside, but knowing how many people she had to rely on was disheartening. She’d never be truly independent, which I knew was so crucial to her. We were so much alike, this remarkable filly and I. 

The next day, Love was exhilarated when I asked how her muscles felt after all her exertion. They’re a little stiff, but that’s okay. Being outside makes my lungs expand, which feels good. I told her the new cart was finally ready. I know it’s outside my stall. I told her we’d be out the next afternoon. I’m sure it will take some adjustments. Please be patient. Hurry. 

The stronger cart was donated by the generous builder. Love attracted the most wonderful people to her and brought out the best in everyone. The cart supported her weight and had wheels that swiveled. She galloped out, calling to the other horses. She seemed so proud of herself. 

Later, I asked what she was screaming at the other horses. When I told them you were going to fix me so I could go out, they told me people wouldn’t if it was too hard. I wanted to show them they were wrong about people. The older horses’ low opinion of people broke my heart, but I certainly understood it. I asked how she felt. Did anything hurt? I don’t really know how I feel. I’m enjoying it so much. I don’t focus on anything negative. Smart gal. Do you feel your hind legs? Not much, just a little. I use my hips to move them when I’m going fast enough. That’s why I go fast. 

We got Love out again the following day. She was elated, moving fast and attempting to buck and play just like any four-month-old foal. She almost got away from me. I was leaving for a weekend workshop at the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, New York, the next morning. She’d be without my help the next few days. I’m not sure who was happier about her adventures outside, Love or me. No doubt Love, because I knew this was the best we could give her, while she had no expectation for her future. Animals know nothing of future. For Love, now was all she knew – an important lesson we humans could learn from our animal brothers and sisters.
  
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