Friday, October 30, 2020

Thursday, October 29, 2020

How to Improve Study Habits Book 2 of 2: Tips to Starting College Series By Christine Reidhead



“This is a must book for students who want good grades.”
 
How to Improve Study Habits
Book 2 of 2: Tips to Starting College Series
By Christine Reidhead
 
For students 13 through college graduation, Christine Reidhead's guide to building study skills is an extremely important book for those who want to secure their future through good grades. Too many students' grades are falling, especially in a time when regular classrooms cannot fully open. Parents everywhere are at a loss regarding what to do with their responsibilities in the face of the increasing downturn in their children's grades. It seems as though, with the advent of social media, the attention of a lot of students has been shifted from their books to their smartphones or computers. Apart from social media, blame has also been put on a decline in the interest of students regarding education in general. Students, at the moment, do not have the motivation or zeal, as it seems, to even study.
 
Good study habits, or skills, are solutions to the problems experienced by students. This has been true for a long time, but the world is changing rapidly, which also means that the tools employed during study have to be changed in order to keep up.
 
This is especially true as a result of the covid-19 pandemic that has forced students to study and learn from home rather than in the classroom. E-Learning, or online learning, can be effective, but only if the student has the discipline and drive to succeed using the tools and materials they are provided by teachers. Without strong study skills the student will fall behind in the classroom. Online the failure to develop good study skills can be devastating, leading to an inability to achieve the success in life the student could otherwise achieve.
 
This excellent guide walks students through skills and habits which a student, or a person, employs while studying in order to make the most out of the experience. The kind of skills employed by a person, whether good or bad, determines how successful they will be in the process of learning, and Reidhead shows how to understand study skills, discover what kind of learner you are, develop great study skills, avoid bad study habits, identify the best places to study, and how to keep up with Online Learning during the current ovid-19 pandemic. It also helps parents and students to identify when certain students are studying excessively, harming the effectiveness of their studying.
 
This is a must book for students who want good grades. Both a guide and a self-help book, it can help any student of any age, middle school through graduate school, succeed in their classes whether they are held in a classroom or online.
 
Available in eBook HERE!





About the Author
Educator and Humanitarian, Christine Reidhead, is an Assistant Professor and the Founder and CEO of the Nonprofit Organization, AfrikRising. The youngest of five children, she was born in Mesa, Arizona to Phyllis and Daniel Cluff. After graduating from Benson High School in 1997, she attended Pima Community College where she played on the college's basketball team. After transferring to Eastern Arizona College, Christine continued to play basketball and earned an Associate’s degree in General Studies in 2004. She then went on to attend Prescott College, where in 2009, she received her Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education, before also earning her Master’s of Science in Accountancy from the University of Phoenix. Now at Grand Canyon University, she is just one year away from completing the school's Doctoral Leadership and Organizational Development program.
 
During Christine's professional career, she has used her academics to gain several roles in the field of education, starting in 2011, she began working as an Accountant with Navajo Technical University. This position opened the door for her to then serve as a Director of Athletics, Wellness Center Manager and Contracts and Grants Manager with the same university. Today, she now works as the university's Assistant Professor of Business and Program Manager for the Department of Transportation Grant. She is also a Business Department Chair and Faculty Vice President.
 
Alongside these roles, Christine serves her own nonprofit organization, AfrikRising, which provides critical resources to the children of Africa who face starvation, educational limitations, and health disparities. Whether it is in her own local community or multiple populations across the world, it has always been her desire to help others, especially children. Following this desire, Christine currently sits on the Board for Habitat for Humanity and Family Promise of Albuquerque. She also hosts her own podcasts which focus on nonprofits, advocacy, the Tribal College Movement and sports talk. Outside of this and her career, she works tirelessly in serving as a positive example for her two amazing sons. It is her mission to make for certain that they always know the importance of education and feel the joy of helping those who need it most.

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

The Trouble With Fred: The Story of the Cook Street Gang: Part One by Iman Saade



“A suspense filled collage of situations that will transport you back in time...”

The Trouble With Fred:

The True Story of the Cook Street Gang: Part one

by Iman Saade 

Iman, a Syrian Immigrant, recounts the day his brother, Fred, first tried to kill him. Overwhelmed with what nearly happened, Iman sits on his bed contemplating the roots of dysfunction in his family. The picture he paints evokes a better understanding of him in relation to his mother- and a brother he considers a "sociopath."

 

Iman is desperate to feel safe from Fred and knows that there really is no reprieve from his bitter essence. But, feeling safe comes in many forms and Iman finds it on his first day of summer break of his 8th grade year when three strange kids come knocking on his door looking for Fred. What follows is part one of a true coming of age story that is both disturbing and humorous.

Designed to change your life, this short book will teach you how to project your money, your future, your life in five rules, and give you some case studies from the financial world's successes and crises.


Available in Paperback and eBook HERE!

 

About the Author

I am a Father and a Teacher first and foremost. I have dedicated most of my life to teaching Chess to emotionally and behaviorally disturbed children and have realized that the most important practice when working with any human being is building a positive relationship.

The book The Trouble with Fred- the true story of the Cook street Gang, gives insight into the life of a dysfunctional family in order to better appreciate what a young person goes through. It is my first memoir.

 

Dodge It If You Can: Almost true stories of two industry veterans hitting (mostly) business curveballs over a lifetime in Asia by YangUei Aw & David Mouland


Dodge It If You Can:
Almost true stories of two industry veterans hitting (mostly) business curveballs over a lifetime in Asia 
by YangUei Aw  & David Mouland  
 
All businesses, no matter the industry, department, or position, share principles and lessons that we can all learn from.
 
Dodge It If You Can presents the real-life collection of anecdotal incidents of industry veterans David Mouland and Aw Yang Uei. Both have built their careers from scratch, and have braved the challenges throughout their decades in business, as juniors, middle management, top management, and third party consultants.
 
Be enlightened and entertained, as they recount their sometimes unique, sometimes horrifying, and sometimes downright hilarious stories about dodging bullets.
 
This book translates the authors' invaluable experiences into realistic and practical insights that will apply to you too. This book is what they don't teach you in school.
 
Available in Paperback and eBook!
 
 
 

 
About David Mouland
David Mouland
is a graduate from City University London in Aeronautical Engineering, was a manufacturing systems engineer in the space industry, dabbled as a traveler and English teacher, inexplicably moved into supply chain. Likes to be a pig farmer in his spare time.

About Yang Uei AW
YangUei Aw graduated from the University of Waterloo, Canada with a Bachelor of Mathematics (Honours) degree in Computer Science. He started his own business, focusing on supply chain and logistics software in the year 2000. He has represented many top international software brands such as Manhattan Associates, Infor and Blue Yonder (formally known as JDA and Red Prairie). He started his business with 10 dollars and today he has offices in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taiwan.


Tuesday, October 27, 2020

The Thanksgiving Handbook: Learning to Walk in the Life-Changing Power of Giving Thanks by Robert Cozby


"My hope is that you will learn about the history of Thanksgiving as a 
national holiday and how the giving of thanks each day can positively 
impact us no matter what the circumstances."



The Journey Uphill: Biblical Perspectives on Life, Isaiah 43 Verses 1 to 21 By Stephalyn Smith


The Journey Uphill
Biblical Perspectives on Life, Isaiah 43 Verses 1 to 21
By Stephalyn Smith

The Journey Uphill carries the readers on a journey through life, giving them hope in times of adversities. It is a faith guide to empower and assure Christians to look beyond whatever uphill and challenging life experiences they might be passing through and look to God, especially in this period of the corona virus global pandemic. The chapters are based on Isaiah 43 verses 1 to 21. This book is an excellent read to strengthen your faith in Jesus Christ as you journey uphill on the path of life.

Available in Paperback and eBook HERE!




 


Monday, October 26, 2020

Milliron Monday: Chains 10 26 2020



Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M. 

June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010


Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Do you know the thrill of holding a heavy-link chain in your hand? I mean a chain with a hook the size of your head and so heavy, it takes two hands to hold it. Ready to work, a dependable chain can be a lifesaver. As a farmer's daughter, growing up on a Hereford cattle farm, I know the value of a quality chain. Of course, chains are not my thing (except when I need one), but I know Dr. Smith, as a veterinarian, avid logger and farmer, valued his chains.

Yes, men enjoy chains. Like women's jewelry, men collect chains for specific purposes - chains to latch things (gates, horse trailers, doors), pull vehicles (especially tractors out of the mud - another topic altogether), pull logs (logging chains), hoist things in the air, secure items to truck beds, build fences, etc. I don't know all the correct terms associated with chains; however, I do know that you do not misplace or mess with certain chains, except if you are summoned to find one and take it directly to the man who wants to use it. 

There is something about the weight of a chain, too. It's a manly-man thing. The heavier the chain, the more important the work. Dr. Smith, working in his sawmill or around Milliron Clinic and Farm, used chains everyday. 

People usually wear out before chains do. But chains, like memories, are forever. 
 

 
Have a great week ahead.


Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Ripley, Ohio and the Underground Railroad By Matthew Caracciolo


 
Ripley, Ohio and the Underground Railroad
By Matthew Caracciolo
 
The Ohio River valley meanders southeast from Cincinnati on the Ohio River Scenic Byway. This sparsely populated corner of Ohio is home to sleepy Ripley, OH, which had an oversized role in the underground railroad as a major center of abolitionism in the 19th century. Such was the fervor of the town’s anti-slavery sentiment, slaveowners across the river in Kentucky referred to Ripley as the ‘Hell Hole of Abolitionism.’ Today, that legacy is preserved through two historical sites: the John Rankin House and the John Parker House.
 
John Rankin House
Atop a hill overlooking the town and the Ohio River is the John Rankin House, which was a station on the underground railroad. From this vantage point, Rev. Rankin and his family could keep tabs on people crossing the river to Ripley. An estimated 2,000 runaway slaves came through the farm, and none were caught in the process. One of these runaways was the real-life Eliza, a character in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin who shares her story about crossing the icy Ohio River.

John Rankin House

Tours of the inside of the house are at the top of the hour and leave from the visitor’s center. However, it’s free to roam the grounds which has a lovely view of the Ohio River valley.

John Parker House
The John Parker House sits near the river, next to a park and a small but handsome promenade on the riverbank. John Parker was a prominent businessman, entrepreneur, patent holder, and abolitionist in town. He was also African-American, an ex-slave, and a conductor on the underground railroad. He assisted hundreds of runaway slaves cross the river into Ohio, delivering them into the hands of people like Rev. Rankin. His house is now a small museum, with displays on Parker’s life and the underground railroad.
 
What else can you do in Ripley?
Though the town is small, it’s situated on a beautiful curve of the Ohio River. Walk from the John Parker House along the river, past old, stately homes to Cohearts Riverhouse to grab an inexpensive bite to eat. Even better, order takeout and enjoy your food outside on a bench, watching river traffic go by. If you want to stay for a peaceful night, the Signal House Bed and Breakfast is also along the river near the John Parker House. There are a handful of shops in town, such as the Olde Piano Factory Antique store. There’s also the Ripley Museum, a sort of hodge podge collection of local history artifacts. Hours are a little spotty though, and are mainly during the weekends.
 
If you’re still in a historical mood, there are some nearby spots relevant to President Ulysses S. Grant’s life. West of town on the Ohio River Scenic Byway is Grant’s Birthplace State Memorial, a humble little cottage where our 18th president was born. Inland from the river in Georgetown is the US Grant Boyhood Home and Schoolhouse, a larger home the family moved into when Grant was a boy.
 
All told, Ripley is a unique day trip option for Ohioans and Kentuckians full of history and excuses to enjoy the river.
 
Matthew Caracciolo is a freelance writer and author of The Waygook Book: A Foreigner’s Guide to South Korea from Monday Creek Publishing. He also maintains his own travel blog, Travel is Fatal, on his website. To find out more about The Waygook Book or Travel is Fatal, please visit matthewcaracciolo.com.

Saturday, October 24, 2020

Five Ways to Clean Up Your Sentences By Matthew Caracciolo


Five Ways to Clean Up Your Sentences
By Matthew Caracciolo
 
Your first draft is done and you’re on to your second, third, or even fourth draft. You’ve spent countless hours tweaking the story, fixing spots that don’t make sense, improving the pacing, and further developing characters. The global issues are, for the most part, taken care of. Now it’s time to take a closer look at sentence-level issues. Is the writing clear? Is it lively? Is it efficient? As much as a good story, people want readability. Clunky writing, no matter how excellent the story, not only detracts from the reading experience, it reduces the chance that your work is going to see publication in the first place. Before sending off to an editor or agent, review your sentences for these common mistakes.
 
Avoid Passive Voice
Passive voice, or essentially using “was” before a past tense verb, is not usually the most efficient way to write but it tends to show up when hammering out a rough draft. It’s also easy to forget to include the subject when writing in passive voice. “The party was enjoyed” doesn’t say who enjoyed the party. “The class enjoyed the party” tells the reader who you’re talking about. If you did write “The party was enjoyed by the class,” you’re using two extra words to say the exact same thing. There are times when passive voice is useful, but generally it’s best practice to avoid it. This leads to my next point.
 
Reconsider Wordy Sentences
To quote Danny Ocean from Ocean’s 11, “Don’t use five words when three will do.” Using too many descriptive words, or too many similarly-defined words, or using clunky sentence structure will slow your reader down and detract from your story’s readability. Keep it simple. Use the best word, not the longest. Take out words that don’t add to your sentence’s meaning.
 
Minimize Adverbs
One strategy for avoiding wordiness is minimizing your adverbs. We’re not taught that adverbs are lazy, but that’s precisely what they are: a word to describe how something is done rather than showing how it was done. “Slowly, I stumblingly wandered to the kitchen where I just made myself a bowl of cereal” has way too many adverbs in it, and it’s relying on the adverbs to tell the reader how things were done. “Eyes half open and dragging my sleepy feet, I wandered to the refrigerator where I made myself a bowl of cereal” eliminates the adverbs and replaces them with descriptive, sensory details that show, rather than tell the reader how I entered the kitchen. Removing adverbs forces you to visualize a scene and insert details that allow the reader to step into the scene. And yes, “just” is an adverb. Technically, in this example, I added words to my sentence, but which sentence sounds wordier? I get more bang out of my buck with the words in my second sentence.
 
Simplify Dialogue Tags
If your story includes a lot of dialogue, it’s tempting to venture away from using the ‘said’ tag to more flowery language…he “remarked,” she “stammered,” they “exclaimed.” While these and others certainly have a place and time, it’s best to save them for when they’re most needed. Stick to the basics—said, asked, etc.—and save the more specific tags for the moments where they will have the most bite.
 
Use an Editing App or Website
Before sending off to an editor, let an editing program run through your work. Personally, I like to use Hemingwayapp.com. Copy your work into the window and the free service locates adverbs, passive voice, and overly convoluted sentences to assign your writing a readability grade. You don’t have to make every change the app suggests (I like my sentences long sometimes), but it’s good to review sentences and perhaps make incremental changes to improve the overall readability.
 
What mistakes do you find yourself making? What editing strategies have you found successful?
 
Matthew Caracciolo is a freelance writer and author of The Waygook Book: A Foreigner’s Guide to South Korea from Monday Creek Publishing. He also maintains his own travel blog, Travel is Fatal, on his website. To find out more about The Waygook Book or Travel is Fatal, please visit matthewcaracciolo.com.
 
Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

 

Friday, October 23, 2020

Tao by Linshu Gao

Tao  

by Linshu Gao

A brilliant Doctor designed a perfect system that can put people into deep hibernation for hundreds of years. Hypnos, that's what he decided to name it. Of course, it's, as usual, a privilege for rich people. Only a few hundred people could afford the ticket. But who doesn't want to go to the future where everything is better than now.

Aaron, an ordinary botany student, after struggles, finally sneaked into the Hypnos tower. After he woke up in the abandoned tower, the world he knew was long gone. In order to survive, he must cooperate with others.

They had to find out what happened to the old world, and what lead them so far from their plan.

Soon they realized something evil was surrounding them, and everyone in the tower was somehow connected. Their relationships were not simple but treacherous.

How could they rescue themselves and save the world?


Available in Paperback and eBook HERE!


About the Author

Linshu Gao is a young author who aims to create Science Fiction, Dystopia, and Fantasy stories. Before becoming a storyteller, Linshu graduated from Beijing Forestry University with a degree in soil and water conservation and anti-desertification. His best and favorite subject is Ecology, which changed his way of thinking. Now he is studying music in Hamburg to explore a new world.

When he is not writing in front of his desk, he loves to spend time in the wild, seeking, and admiring nature. And he is also an enthusiastic fan of basketball and badminton. 

Connect with Gao…

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LinshuGaoAuthor927/

Instagram: @linshugaoauthor927

 






 

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Monday Creek Publishing Digest October 2020: Featured Author Curt J. Robinette


 Featured Author

Curt J. Robinette

Curt J. Robinette was born and raised in a small city, Nelsonville, in southeastern Ohio. The former coal-mining center of the USA, Nelsonville is now 5,000 folks trying to hold on to the memories of brighter days. I grew up, never worrying about safety or issues that plague our country today. Joking about growing up with my head in a bag, I was oblivious to anything but playing baseball and chasing girls. Never adept at either activity, I still had a wonderful childhood. After one tumultuous semester at Ohio University and facing the draft, I enlisted in the U.S. Navy and began a 20-year career and love affair. By no means a military addict, I loved the work and the lifestyle of changing scenery every three or four years. Believe it or not, there is great security in a military career, if you live through it and most do. Two trips on the USS Enterprise to the coast of Viet Nam, where the guilt grew from knowing that boys from my hometown were dying in-country. It's something that you don't get over, but you do learn to live with. After the Navy and obtaining my Bachelor's degree, I was hired to manage various government IT contracts for the next 27 years. As an aside, during that time, I worked for the State of Virginia and five different IT companies. The last of the five companies just merged and retired the name, so technically all the companies that I have worked for no longer exist. I hope I didn't have much to do with their demise and take some consolation that the State of Virginia is still alive and kicking. Retiring in 2009, I then had lots of time to work on my family history which I had dabbled with since 1993. I kept finding information on my grandfather's half-brother Hiram, who was a 2nd LT in the First West Virginia Cavalry during the Civil War. So much information was available and it became more apparent with each new piece that this was a story that just needed to be shared. In 2015, at the suggestion and with the aid of my sisters, I put the story together, first in a spreadsheet, then into a Powerpoint presentation and finally into words. I had so much information and after putting it in linear order, I began to imagine how Hiram got from Point A to B to C, etc. Every opportunity to utilize facts and my imagination when needed and finally I had a story. For wanna-be authors, I first tried doing my own editing and self-publishing. If you are experienced, you might pull that off. I am a novice and I failed fairly miserably at attempts to do that. When I found Gina McKnight at Monday Creek Publishing and she accepted my book, the entire process turned around. It became a professional endeavor in every sense of the word. The final product is awesome and if you give it a read, you will agree that the two main characters (who are real people, by the way) were heroic and incredible young men in a very tumultuous time in American history. I am in the process of researching and writing a second story involving Hiram and his family. It will be about my grandfather and his siblings growing up in southeastern Ohio. It includes mystery, possible murder, and hard times in 19th century America.

Additionally, working on a short book about the many humorous incidents that I experienced during my 20 year Navy career. Each duty station, the "old salts" would always complain about this not being the Navy. I eventually came to the realization that in 20 years of trying, I never found it, thus the title "This is not the 'real' Navy!"


A young man from Chauncey, Ohio, is one of the first to answer the President’s call for volunteers to help defend the nation. As a “90-day wonder”, he evaluates his opportunities and makes the choice of cavalry over infantry. With his childhood friend, they depart on the trip of a lifetime. Based upon actual experiences, good and bad. A story filled with military and historical facts and appropriate assumptions to get them where they ended up. Heroes of a different sort, Hiram and Robert answered the call to duty and gave their best to help save the country. Experience their adventures and immediately realize their contributions. It is an engaging emotional story that leaves the reader wanting more.

Connect with Robinette!

Amazon Author Page

Instagram @robinettecurtj

Monday Creek Publishing: Curt J. Robinette Facebook Album 

Curt J. Robinette, Author Facebook Page

YouTube Author Promotion

Riding & Writing Author Interview



Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Anna Elizabeth Judd, Western Novelist

Anna Elizabeth Judd

About the Author

Anna provides it all as if you are in the saddle along for the journey. Her rare books bring the readers joy from nearly every genre they can appreciate. She exuberantly brings the image and sentiments of the west to full life throughout the storyline. Yet, at the core of Judd’s work is a black stallion who engages life into every aspect of the book. Haystack fills children’s mind with wonder as he interacts with Marshal Spur and the Outrider Gang, to the mild minored young steed who brings Adam to new levels of learning in his life. Then he is brilliantly portrayed as a beautiful Appaloosa stallion in the Broncobuster as Cash.

Anna Elizabeth Judd includes a vast trove of Western Novels depicting the “Cowboy Way,” Horse Whispers, Gunslingers, and the Wild West, but very few scratch the surface relative to the vibrant depictions through which Anna takes this storyline in The Hourglass of el Diablo.

In her newest edition, The Handbook of Horsemanship Ann shows her extended knowledge in the art of horse training. As she originally wrote the book for her clients, so after the training with her was complete they would have a guide to take home. It ensured their continued success in the world of horsemanship.

Anna has many other books planned in the future, so stay tuned for the next adventure of Marshal Spur and the Outlaw coming winter 2020. But…… don’t think she has left us longing…. Dive into her new music album for all the young cowboys and girls in the world. Spur Up! Marshal Spur and the Outlaw.

Websites:

thewesternnovelist.com

annaelizabethjudd.com  

Amazon Author Page

Reverb Nation Music Album 

https://www.reverbnation.com/annaelizabethjudd/song/31976038-the-hourglass

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/thewesternnovelist/

Instagram:  www.instagram.com/westernsbyjudd/

Twitter:  twitter.com/westernsbyjudd

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

The Best Card Games for Family Game Night @ Animatopica



Animatopica is super, super committed to making the best card games for kids, teenagers and adults. We make family-friendly card games for game nights. As a family, you sometimes want card games to play with kids, the best clean card games that have no bad language.


www.animatopica.com/the-best-card-games-for-family-game-nights/




Monday, October 19, 2020

Milliron Monday: Nostalgia 10 19 2020



Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M. 

June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Several years ago, Jody, Dr. Smith's widow, gave me horse leg wraps (see above). The soft interior padding worn smooth, they are weary-worn with lots of miles. P. Smith and the Milliron brand identify the wraps that belonged to Dr. Smith. Knowing the wraps are sentimental to Jody, I store them in a safe place at my barn. 

Last week, I was cleaning and saw the wraps. I decided to see if I could bring them back to life from their battered state. I took the wraps to my house and gently hand-washed each one. Needless to say, they fell apart - things do, I suppose, as they grow old.  But the essence and spirit of the green pads, as inanimate as they are, made me think of Dr. Smith and the many (many) times he used them.

There are things in our lives that we cherish - our tried and true familiar things that give us a sense of who we are. "Oh, I've had these wraps since I had that one horse..." I suppose it's a kind of nostalgia, bringing a brief sadness to people, things, or events that happened in the past. 

What do I do with four wraps that once served a purpose, but have fallen apart and are of no use? The best I can do is take a photo and write about them. 

Have a great week ahead.


Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Sunday, October 18, 2020

Didi the Picky Puppy by Kate Maher


 
Didi the Picky Puppy
by Kate Maher
 
Didi the dog is a cute pup with a familiar problem... she is a picky eater! Her loving owner attempts to fix the problem by providing many delicious food options and settings! Ultimately, she seeks help from a veterinarian to find a healthy solution. Follow along with Didi and her owner as they discover just what a picky pup needs to eat right.
 
Available in Hardcover!
 
 
 
About the Author
Dr. Kate Maher received her veterinary degree from Mississippi State University. Realizing the desperate need for in-home care in her community, she built a veterinary house call practice focusing primarily on preventative medicine. She participates in low-cost vaccine clinics on the weekends, and fulfills her passion for caring for homeless and neglected pets by working for non-profit organizations that seek to reduce pet overpopulation. To maximize her impact in the field of animal welfare, she focuses on influencing legislation that benefits the health and wellness of all species. In an effort to combine her love of children, animals, and her profession, she decided to write a story for kids about pets and vets.



Saturday, October 17, 2020

Things to do in Marietta, Ohio By Matthew Caracciolo



Things to do in Marietta, Ohio
By Matthew Caracciolo

Marietta, OH was the first official settlement of the Northwest Territory, which was the first territorial expansion of the United States of America after winning its independence from Great Britain. Established in 1788—only five years after the end of the Revolutionary War—Marietta was founded by settlers from the Ohio Company of Associates; a good percentage of them veterans and officers of the Revolutionary War including the famed General Rufus Putnam. As such, it’s one of the most historical cities in Ohio and a premier destination in Southeast Ohio. On top of historic sites, the city boasts a distinct river town culture, excellent dining, and tons of recreation in the area. So what can you do in Marietta?

Learn about the Northwest Territory

As the first official settlement of the Northwest Territory, Marietta is a natural place to learn about this part of American history. Visit the Campus Martius Museum which is situated on the grounds of the former Campus Martius civilian fortification and features the only remaining part of that structure: the Rufus Putnam house. There’s a good deal of artifacts and information about the development of this part of Ohio, as well as an exhibit on Appalachian culture. Afterwards, visit the Mound Cemetery to see the final resting places of the names you saw in the museum. There are more Revolutionary War officers buried here than in any cemetery in the United States. The cemetery gets its name from a large, conical mound built by the Hopewell Culture that sits in the back of the grounds.

Explore the Ohio River and Muskingum River

Marietta sits at the confluence of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers (and is thus prone to flooding). Hop on a tour with the Valley Gem Sternwheeler which does sightseeing and dinner tours on both rivers. Or paddle your way along the water with Marietta Adventure Company’s kayak rentals and tours.

Get out Marietta’s Trails

Surrounded on all sides by the Appalachian foothills, Marietta is in the center of a lot of hiking and biking opportunities. The Marietta segment of Wayne National Forest lies to the east and is one of the remotest corners of Ohio—perfect for backpacking. Marietta is also carving out a niche as a mountain biking mecca. The city itself has more than 30 miles of mountain bike trails within city limits. The Marietta Adventure Company is a good resource on the area’s mountain bike trails.

Eat Local


There’s plenty to eat in town, so plan accordingly. Many locals recommend the Marietta Brewing Company, a popular brewpub and a relaxed, family-friendly spot. For breakfast, longtime favorite Busy Bee was established in 1944 and is a bargain for the size of the pancakes and quality of the orange juice. For some fine dining, check out the Buckley House Restaurant in a historic mansion near downtown.

Visit a Castle

Ok, it’s generous to call this house a “castle,” but that’s the name it goes by. The gothic revival Castle Historic House Museum was completed in 1855 and is recognizable by its iconic bird’s nest. Tours start in the carriage house and cover the family history, the changes they made to the house over time, and the era-appropriate furnishings and gardens.

There are two independent hotels in downtown Marietta, including the historic Lafayette Hotel that transports guests to the steamboat era. The town is compact, set on a grid, and easily walkable—exactly what you need for an easy, relaxing weekend trip.

Have you been to Marietta? What did you see?
 
Matthew Caracciolo is a freelance writer and author of The Waygook Book: A Foreigner’s Guide to South Korea from Monday Creek Publishing. He also maintains his own travel blog, Travel is Fatal, on his website. To find out more about The Waygook Book or Travel is Fatal, please visit matthewcaracciolo.com.


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