Monday, April 19, 2021

Milliron Monday: Taking it for Granted 4 19 2021

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

This week I am excited to share with you Grant Smith's Taking it for Granted podcast! Grant, Dr. Smith's grandson, brings an engaging podcast with amazing guests. An informed host, Grant asks the difficult questions that everyone wants to hear. Inspiring and motivating, I highly recommend listening! Connect with Grant on Facebook for updates about new podcasts!

Listen wherever podcasts are available, including iHeartRadio and Spotify.



Have a great week ahead.


Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.


Sunday, April 18, 2021

Annie Oakley: The Poem by Shane Nielsen

Deep in the Ohio woods, to bluish grey eyes espy,
The wondrous echoes of nature give their humble reply,
to the spirit of sight, and the will to try.
Billows of smoke from fires who do not cease to prier,
ventured the aptly named Little Miss Sharpshooter,
the stakes couldn't be higher.
To feed the sick and hungry, to blow away the competition,
to set all new records and rewrite the given,
No one aimed higher,
no one was more driven.

How could it be difficult?

How could sight not believe?

Skeptics and naysayers? Hard to conceive.
Bolts of lightning cast forth from the soul of the West,
struck down the greatest, struck down the best.
You can relax, even before you go far,
Aim for something in reach-"light up" a cigar.
With enough gold in trophies to fill the banks of a river,
Even Queen Victoria remembers the show you would give her.
After winning every round, with spunk and esteem,
you're worth more than a thousand words to fit in every magazine.
It isn't that that's important-it's the simple things of course.
Sitting by the gentle waters-feeding a horse.
So aim for your dreams, listen to that fire,
obey your intuition, your heart is not a liar.
Everyone, including Sitting Bull knew-that your aim was impeccable, that your heart was true.
Yes, with a heart so golden, a shell so strong,
It's no wonder you were the biggest lil legend that ever came along.
You are unique,
No need to be a replica,
Yes it is true, my dear Miss America.


About the Author:
My name is Shane Nielsen I write original fiction, fanfiction, and short stories as well as poems. Here is my motivational poem I wrote about my favorite historical figure: Annie Oakley.





Monday, April 12, 2021

Milliron Monday: My Side of the Street - April 4 12 2021

 

Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

This month we remember Dr. Smith's mother, Elizabeth Cooper Saunders Smith. "Betty" was a prolific writer, writing for several publications at different times throughout her lifetime. An excerpt from her obituary...

Elizabeth was a longtime member of the Millbrook Garden Club for which she wrote their newsletter for many years. She also wrote a column, My Side of the Street, for the Millbrook Round Table for 12 years. In 1996, the family moved Abbott, overtaken by Parkinson's and related medical conditions, to Farmington to reside at Edgewood Manor until his death in 1998. After selling their Millbrook home, Elizabeth moved to Kingfield in 1996 to live with her daughter Susan. In addition to a short stint writing a column for the local (Kingfield, Maine) paper, The Irregular.  

From Pete's mother, Betty, My Side of the Street...

A brook, nicely walled up, runs beside our house and under a little bridge to join the Carrabasset. Yesterday when the sun was warmest, a flock of blackbirds seemed to be having a group bathing party. They flew down from the tall bare trees a few at a time, and then back up to the branches to shake the water off their wings. I am not an ornithologist, but I would assume that they will wait to mate until there are leaves on the trees. And this is the time of year when I usually make my prediction, "In another couple of weeks the leaves will be out" - a statement that usually brought a laugh from my spouse.

It has been an extraordinary April so far, and people were beginning to say that we need rain. Last night Jupiter Pluvius favored us with a good soak and the river is roaring this morning. My daughter in Castle Rock, Colo., reports that they have had snow showers rather than rain. She picked some daffodils which were bending over with snow, and they perked up in the house as if grateful.

The memorable words come to mind of that great ego, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, about old soldiers, just fading away, except that old gardeners just keep on planting. I have gambled on a small planting of green beans, the ground being quite warm. Maybe that will bring back cold weather...
   
Skis on cars have been replaced by canoes, and snowmobiles by towed boats. Mainers are dyed-in-the-wool outdoor people. If all else fails, they go hiking. It makes on wonder how it is that there are more smokers in Maine than any other state.

Mr. Goldstone's speech to the National Press Club has certainly brought out an assortment of opinions on all sides. I am not nor have I ever been a smoker, but I do not understand why the tobacco business should be sued for millions by those who are. Surely if you know cigarettes are harmful you are to blame if you smoke them. If you get drunk and drive your car into a tree, should the car maker be sued? Maybe the guilty parties are the senators who kept subsidizing the tobacco farmers. It always seemed to me that those growers should be encouraged to grow other crops such as soy beans, which have so many uses.

Problems such as these go around and around. Maine will be voting again on the subject of forest users. Another related matter is the control of additional land give by Great Northern Paper to Baxter Park, given to the state by Gov. Baxter many years ago, along with a trust fund ample enough to maintain it. Mount Katahdin, the highest mountain in Maine and the beginning of the Appalachian Trail, is a treasure enjoyed by a great number of people. The three men who are the trustees of the park appear to be unduly influenced by sports groups such as Fin & Feather, and the fact that paper companies pay part of the salary of the forester member. Opening the park to snowmobiles is a tender subject, as well as hunting. Access roads would be a decided detriment to the nature of the park, as Gov. Baxter intended it to remain.

"Maine Times" has published a series of reports on the subject. One writer expresses it very well, saying that there are a great many more people who enjoy the woods and wilds who do not hunt than those who do, and that we shouldn't have to dress up like clowns to go into the woods without risking being shot.

The present time is enjoyable for a similar reason. The snow has gone enough to permit walking without being in danger of snowmobilers, and the black flies are waiting for whatever it is that black flies are awakened by, and of course there are no hunters. So I shall seize the day and Hannah and I into the woods will go - at least for a little way. We would not want to meet a black bear, thought I am sure such an encounter would not be a fatal one, the bear being more afraid of people. I don't believe that our small border collie would be interested in chasing him, either.



Have a great week ahead.



Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Meeting Megan: An Interview with Megan Etcheberry

 

Megan Etcheberry

Meeting Megan: An Interview with Megan Etcheberry
by Gina McKnight
Archived from the March 2021 Issue of Florida Equine Athlete
No duplication with Permission
 
“Barrel racing is a never-ending learning process…”
 
Megan Etcheberry loves horses. Her horse history is the envy of every cowgirl - riding at an early age, she grew up in Oregon with a cowgirl mom, western sunsets, and ranch horses. Her mother introduced her to barrel racing and the rest is history. The topic of many articles and once a cast member of the A&E reality show Rodeo Girls, Megan is super busy these days. Even though she has “hung up my cowgirl hat” Megan can offer sound wisdom to all riders. I caught up with Megan at her home in Spain to talk about horses, barrel racing, her non-profits, and horsemanship!
 
Welcome, Megan!
 
GM: Looking through your cowgirl profile, you have been in major magazines, including Cosmopolitan, talking about Rodeo Girls, the A&E reality show. Besides all the press, I know your first love is horses. What does it take to be a professional barrel racer?
ME: Horses will always be my first love. Don’t tell my dog! Home for me is riding bareback in the forest, galloping up the trails, feeling every muscle in my horse’s back as we fly in unison. It’s where all negativity melts away and my mind goes quiet. Which is quite the opposite of barrel racing! However, both require complete trust, courage and synergy from both horse and rider. I have asked my horses to do a lot of petrifying things: run into dark tunnels, loud arenas and shifty ground. You can train, train, train but at the end of the day, the unbreakable bond that you have with your horse is what it takes to barrel race.
 
GM: A successful career, doing what you love! When did you meet your first horse?
ME: Horses have been in my life since I can remember. My mother grew up on a ranch and was glued to a horse at every waking moment. With time, her passion only grew stronger so there has never been a time that our family has been without horses. My first memory of riding a horse is on my Aunt’s ranch herding cows. I remember riding all day long then getting off and feeling so incredibly small. It wasn’t until my 7th birthday that I got a horse of my very own, Birdie. He was the perfect babysitter. I couldn’t lift a saddle nor put on a bridle, but I could throw on a hackamore, push him up to a fence and be off to the races. We have been fortunate enough to have a lot of great horses come through our barn, but that was one special dude.
 
GM: What advice do you have for girls starting out on the barrel racing circuit?
ME: Barrel racing is a never ending learning process, a process unique to you and your horse. Focus on your personal goals for your horse, and celebrate their small victories along the way. You will experience extreme highs immediately followed by crushing lows. Everyone will be quick to give you advice and pick apart each and every run. Stay strong cowgirl! Find someone whom you admire to adopt as your mentor. Learn from the good and kindly leave the bad, knowing that at the end of the day, you do what’s best for your horse. Also...wear a helmet!
 
GM: You're not riding the rodeo now. Do you miss it? What do you miss the most?
ME: I hung up my cowgirl hat to finish college and take on new adventures life threw my way. But I will forever be grateful for that magical time in my life! It is a time I will cherish forever because I was able to spend with my mom. We had way too much fun truckin’ down the rodeo trail, barrel racing together. All of the small towns, long drives, hit barrels, flat tires, and grueling weather. I wouldn’t trade it for anything! 
 
GM: Tell us about Reins of Grace and Breaking Chains, your two non-profits to help human trafficking…
ME: When I moved to Portland to attend Portland State University, I learned about the human trafficking problem in Portland. It broke my heart to know that young girls right outside my door were being bought and sold on a daily basis. My mom and I put our li’l noggins together and founded an organization called Reins of Grace. Our mission is to outreach to sex-trafficked girls in Portland by using equine therapy at our farm. Horses are empathetic, perceptive and act as a safe place for people who have experienced trauma to connect in a way that might not be possible with another person. We always say that the horses do all of the work, we are just there to facilitate. When the Rodeo Girls opportunity popped up, I saw it as an opportunity to spread awareness on a national platform, thus the birth of Breaking Chains. I was able to spread awareness of sex-trafficking while raising money for safe houses in Portland. 
 
GM: Horses are spiritual and your endeavors to help others is inspiring. Describe a day in your life...
ME: My daily life may have changed since the days of rodeo but my gypsy heart sure hasn’t. I am still impulsively popping around, just on a global scale these days. I live in the Basque Country, where my family is from. I work from home so most of my days are spent enjoying the company of my partner, spending time with friends and learning languages. Two of those things are a lot easier than the other. And in the future, who knows? I could start the first Basque Country barrel racing association. 
 
GM: What horses do you currently stable?
ME: We have had a rainbow of horses join our family throughout the years. From giant warm-bloods to gritty rodeo veterans to beautiful palomino divas to rehabilitation horses that were going to be put down. But our family is pretty small at the moment. 
 
We currently have my girl HG Tainis Eagle, “Indy”. I was under contract with Rodeo Girls when my previous horse got hurt and was out for the season. Indy was a god-send that came to me right before the show started taping - thanks to a good friend in Indiana. She is a little barrel racing fire-cracker with more grit than Clint Eastwood.
 
We also have my mom’s barrel racing horse, LF Soon to be Famous, aka “Sooner”. I’ve never ridden a faster horse. It feels like riding a sling-shot. I don’t know how my mom does it!
We also have Sooner’s baby, JB. He is learning the barrel racing ropes right now. But if he has half of the speed that his mamma does, he’s going to be fun!
 
GM: What does horsemanship mean to you?
ME: Many people can ride a horse but not very many people possess true horsemanship. I know I sure don’t! I have, however, been fortunate enough to know people who do, from whom I have learned. I’ve been able to ride with some badass ladies and taken clinics from pros to pick up tips and tricks throughout my life. To me, horsemanship means patience, kindness and forgiveness. It doesn’t take a half-decent rider to bully a horse into submission. It’s the riders who know what to ask, how to ask and also when to stop, that I admire. 
 
Connect with Megan…
Reins of Grace
Breaking Chains
Instagram

Megan Etcheberry


Megan Etcheberry


Megan Etcheberry
All photos courtesy of Megan Etcheberry.


Milliron Monday: My Side of the Street - Spring 4 5 2021

 

Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

This month we remember Dr. Smith's mother, Elizabeth Cooper Saunders Smith. "Betty" was a prolific writer, writing for several publications at different times throughout her lifetime. An excerpt from her obituary...

Elizabeth was a longtime member of the Millbrook Garden Club for which she wrote their newsletter for many years. She also wrote a column, My Side of the Street, for the Millbrook Round Table for 12 years. In 1996, the family moved Abbott, overtaken by Parkinson's and related medical conditions, to Farmington to reside at Edgewood Manor until his death in 1998. After selling their Millbrook home, Elizabeth moved to Kingfield in 1996 to live with her daughter Susan. In addition to a short stint writing a column for the local (Kingfield, Maine) paper, The Irregular.  

From Pete's mother, Betty, My Side of the Street...

Taking advantage of transportation in both directions, I have just returned from one of my visits to Portland. After leaving relatively barren Kingfield, it was a thrill to roll into that busy city on Casco Bay. There were golden banks of forsythia, leaves emerging on birches, and maples had their spring bloom to brighten the landscape. All along the road through Belgrade and beside 95 from Augusta it was a different story - brush was piled high awaiting chippers or to be hauled off in trucks. All this as a result of the ice storm in March.

On what turned out to be the sunniest day, my hostess drove me up to Norway (Maine) for a picnic out of doors with her grandchildren - school being out that week. Afterward we drove up to Paris Hill, not far from the Poland Spring House. What a glorious village - my nomination for the prettiest one in America. Paris Hill was settled prior to the turn of the century by such important people as Hannibal Hamlin and other Washington personages. It is an historically important preserve, big white houses immaculately kept, not a piece of trash in sight! A small jail constructed of neat granite blocks has been transformed into a historical museum. It is hard to imagine who the tenants of that jail might have been when it was functioning!

Crowing it all is a magnificent view of Mount Washington and the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The yearly residents surely chose this location for the summer breezes and the view. Probably they were attracted while guests of the famous old Poland Spring House. 

A major occupations for me when I'm visiting my friend Mary is reading books I don't seem to see in other places. Notably, this time was a book by Elliott Roosevelt, "Murder in the Blue Room." This is only one of seven murder mysteries he wrote, in all of which his mother, Eleanor, is the detective who figures out the guilty party. It is not a long book, but a real "page turner." It's reminiscent of Margaret Truman's mysteries written about Washington, particularly the Senate. Both, children of presidents, were in a good position to write such stories. Elliott uses real people who visit the White House, and we learn interesting bits about them, often from remarks made by the household staff. This particular book is based on a period when a Russian personage was the guest. Nelson Rockefeller enters into the picture, as well as some World War II personalities.

Well, that was but one of several books I read while away, and now, back in Kingfield, I have a quantity of well-recommended volumes brought to me by other very literate friends. All that and the "Maine Times," which has an interesting array of columnists covering the various points of controversy which seem to pop up in any place in habited by homo sapiens. We have an ongoing battle between sportsmen, woodsmen, and preservationists. The latter have the most difficult time, since the aforementioned groups are interested only in themselves and their way of life. Perhaps this has something to do with the recent figures that some 18% of Maine people are unable to fill out forms and presumably read very few books of any kind. At least we may say they have their hearts in the right place because we read that they always come to the aid of the victims of disaster.
    
My 92-year-old neighbor gets back from Florida today, and I shall be glad to see her lights again. The couple who rake her lawn have done their usual good job, so all is in readiness. It is also good to note that the mountain ash tree which we share is putting out buds - and I had thought it was a lost cause!

I read that the ice is out on Moosehead Lake - the earliest in years. It cleared on April 27; the average is May 7-10-last year May 11. And Paul Bunyan's statue in Bangor is being sanded and repainted. Last year, Longfellow's statue in Portland was cleaned with crushed walnut shells - a method that keeps the pigeons away!! I hope that all this good news cheers you, and finds Millbrook ready for a great season.


Have a great week ahead.



Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Monday, March 29, 2021

Milliron Monday: Journey to Fernwood 3 29 21


Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

It's always a fun day when I get to hang out with Jody Smith. Last Thursday, we traveled to Fernwood Farm, the home of fine artist Kelly Lincoln. Also known as The Pig Patch, Fernwood Farm is home to a menagerie; chickens, sheep, pigs (mostly), one cat, one dog, and lots of creativity. Jody and I traveled State Route 550 - a scenic route of Amish buggies (although we didn't see any), Spring forsythia and daffodils, farmers tilling their fields, and rolling SE Ohio countryside.

Arriving to Fernwood, we were greeted by the mixed blue-tick hound, Cookie and his feline companion. Sheila and Darla, the Fernwood sheep, were happy to receive visitors. The sound of "oinks" quickly got our attention and we caught up on all the pig-happenings - new pigs, our favorite pig (George), old pigs, curly pig (Jane), momma pig (Sally who is pregnant), and all the mini-pigs. 

George is so much fun. He is my penpal (well, not really, that would be Kelly). George sends me all kinds of cool mail. So cool that Kelly and I have collaborated for a new book Mail from Fernwood (tentative title), where George is the spotlight. Visit our Pinterest page to read some of George's handiwork. We are excited about this project and hope you will be, too! 

After we visited with all the animals, we ate lunch at The Galley, a super spot for lunch and conversation (they have great coffee). Back to Fernwood, we thanked our gracious host, said our goodbyes and headed for home.

Jody and I talked about the many times she traveled State Route 550 to help Pete with veterinarian errands. She described how the windy road could be treacherous in the wintertime. We reminisced about Pete and the many stories that make up Milliron

Sometimes there are no words to explain the comfort of good friends. I look forward to seeing Jody again and making the journey to Fernwood.

Have a great week ahead.






Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.


Milliron Monday: Taking it for Granted 4 19 2021

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M. June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010 Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy...