Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Quotes, Quips, and Wisdom 12 12 18

Monday Creek Publishing
Quotes, Quips, and Wisdom
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Monday Creek Publishing
Quotes, Quips, and Wisdom
Follow us on fb Monday Creek Publishing

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

An Autistic Guy's Guide to Security by TLCR


Available in Paperback here!

An Autistic Guy's Guide to Security 
by TLCR

By the time you have read this book you will be able to live a more secure life. You don't need any form of autism to read it, but it helps. The advice is easy to follow and written in a way that anyone can understand.


About the Author
As someone with Asperger's I have a unique life experience and like to share this in my writing. In today's age of surveillance, the data economy and increased instability I hope my content will help my readers deal with this new reality.

I value my privacy, which is why I use a pen name. I do not have any social media presence, so do not be fooled by impostors.



Monday, December 10, 2018

Milliron Monday: Carol Lambert 12 10 18


Photo by Carol Lambert
Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast, Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Traveling throughout southeastern Ohio with Dr. Smith's widow, Jody, I continue to have the great opportunity to meet many wonderful people - all I call friend. I was sad to receive an email last week about the passing of my dear friend, Carol Lambert, a beloved client of Milliron Clinic and a friend to Dr. Smith.

Carol was an advocate for every animal, but in particular, she loved dogs. As her obituary in yesterday's The Athens Messenger states, "Carol was renowned for her passion and enthusiasm for many causes. She perhaps is best known for her dedication to dog rescue, which she passed on to her children."

A member of several philanthropic and humanitarian organizations, Carol will be missed by many. I enjoyed talking with Carol often about Dr. Smith's biography, the anecdotes she held so dear of Dr. Smith, and her joy for all living creatures.

More recently, I spoke with Carol on the phone about a children's book collaboration with her friend (now my friend), Tamara Martin. Carol and Tamara traveled extensively, advocates for lost and rescued dogs. The premise for Tamara's book is the forgotten dogs of the Navajo and the impact of society on homeless dogs (and people). Beautifully illustrated by Ernest John, Bluebird, A Dog of the Navajo Nation, was a topic that Carol loved to talk about. I am sad that the book will not be released in Carol's lifetime; however, we press forward, and with Carol's inspiration, we will see the project to fruition. The book will launch in 2019 in Carol's memory.

Look for future posts about Carol and her contribution to Dr. Smith's biography, Bluebird, and her letters to me. Carol, a wise and inspirational friend, will be missed. My sincere condolences to her family and the pets she left behind.

Read more in Pete's biography Milliron.
Share your stories and photos of Dr. Smith. 
Email to mondaycreekpublishing@gmail.com 
Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Sweet Christmas Engagement by Amelia St. James


Available in eBook here!

Sweet Christmas Engagement 

Do Christmas miracles exist?

Chocolatier Katie Walters likes to believe they do, until her world is tipped upside down when the handsome Dr. Markus Donovan opens his office next door. Accompanied by his Golden Retriever sidekick, Finley, Markus steals her heart and endears himself to her loved-ones. In the middle of their happily ever after, Katie’s secrets and Markus’ past drive a wedge between them, and Markus’ jealous receptionist wreaks havoc.

Katie’s fledgling company is no match for the scheming woman, and the fate of her employees hangs in the balance. Katie is in desperate need of a Christmas miracle, and her faith in true love is put to a test.


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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Amelia St. James resides in Florida with her darling sons and wonderful husband. Amidst the chaos and excitement, she manages to sneak in time for chocolate and writing, sometimes enjoying both at the same time. She is passionate about writing, and loves all things romantic and optimistic. When not writing, she can be found playing Frisbee with her two year old while simultaneously faking a mean game of soccer with her eight year old.



Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Monday, December 3, 2018

Milliron Monday: The Present 12 3 18


Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast, Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

With Christmas on the horizon and people rushing to find the perfect gift, it brings to mind a memory from Eric Frandson of Pete. Eric is the son of Rowen D. Frandson, D.V.M., one of Pete's professors at Colorado State University. Pete often visited with the Frandson family on their ten-acre ranch outside of Loveland, Colorado. Eric remembers...

“My sister and I were children when he [Pete] would stop by to visit our house. We had a few horses. Pete and my father would ride. My sister and I thought that Pete was the comedian Bob Newhart. We would sneak out when my parents were having coffee or tea with Pete so we could listen to their conversation. I remember him being quite funny and looked just like Bob Newhart. It was exciting to think that my parents knew such a famous person. Later my mother told me that he enjoyed that we had confused him with Newhart. One time, Pete stopped by a week or so before Christmas. He left a beautifully wrapped Christmas box under the tree. My sister and I were unable to lift the heavy box. When my parents had company, they would take them to the tree, point out the present and my father or mother would say, ‘A veterinarian student, Pete Smith, gave us this present, try and lift it.’ Most would give up and smile, when they couldn’t get a grip on the box, much less lift it even an inch. Almost everyone tried to guess what the present could possibly be, but none guessed correctly. Finally, Christmas day arrived, and we tore open our presents, but we wanted our father to open the box from Pete before he opened any others. He had to open the box in place under the tree, and when he got it open, there was a small solid metal anvil. I remember my Dad laughing after he discovered what the present was, and my mother’s broad grin. While one would think the present would be quite the joke, it turns out we had my grandfather’s forge, and this was a very useful present to my father. Pete would come over and use the forge and anvil for horseshoes. I used it too, as I got older. We still have the anvil.”


Read more in Pete's biography Milliron.
Share your stories and photos of Dr. Smith. 
Email to mondaycreekpublishing@gmail.com 
Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Saturday, December 1, 2018

An Interview with Marvin Blanton, Professional Rodeo Announcer by Gina McKnight


An Interview with Marvin Blanton, Professional Rodeo Announcer
by Gina McKnight
Archived from the November 2018 Issue of Florida Equine Athlete www.floridaequineathlete.com
No duplication without permission.

From Blanket, Texas, now living in Campobello, South Carolina, Marvin Blanton is a Professional Rodeo Announcer and seasoned cowboy, announcing the ups and downs in the rodeo arena. Marvin grew up in the rodeo and brings spectators the optimum rodeo experience. Marvin says, "I look around this arena at all the spectators that paid money to get in and my job is to work with this team to make sure they get every penny's worth."  

Welcome, Marvin!

GM: It is a thrill to connect with you, Marvin. Thank you for being part of our Florida Equine Athlete community! I’m positive you’ve had your share of horses. What is your horse history?
MB: I grew up around horses and a father and grandfather who instilled horsemanship and the cowboy way of life. My grandfather was larger than life to me and all I wanted to do at a young age was to make him proud of me and the horses that I rode. I later had the opportunity to work for Johnny Rich on the Standing J Ranch who took me to another level in horsemanship.

GM: When was your first encounter with a horse?
MB: I don’t know that I can remember my first encounter with a horse. Dad put us on horses when we were kids on the ranch in Lometa, Texas, to help out where needed.

GM: Riding the rodeo circuit at a young age, what life-changing experiences did you have and what is your advice to novice riders?
MB: I was actually very fortunate, there were five of us kids and very little money, so buying a high dollar automatic horse was not an option. I was taught to make good horses out of what we had. I will say that drew the attention of others. When they saw the willingness and dedication, they invested their time in me and helped me out as well; people like Buddy Dame, Johnny Rich, Dan Fisher, and Guy Allen. I can’t thank them enough!

My advice to novice riders would be to put more effort into building your horsemanship skills – your horses will thank you for it! Find someone that will teach you the right ways and be a sponge, learn everything you can. Yes……buy a horse that is sound, safe and capable of the discipline that you want to participate in, but start out putting more time and money into a clinician. This will impact every horse you come in contact with for the rest of your life.

GM: That is wise advice. When did you become a Professional Rodeo Announcer?
MB: We’ve been announcing since 2001.

GM: Throughout your career as an announcer, what event is the most memorable?
MB:  Three years ago announcing the Pendleton, South Carolina Rodeo and working with The One Armed Bandit John Payne because I used to watch John perform when I roped in the PRCA years ago and now getting to work with him was full circle for me in the industry. Checked that one off of the bucket list!

He’s a great entertainer and pretty cool to call him a friend.

GM: John Payne is cool! I saw him in action in Columbus, Ohio, at Equine Affaire. In your opinion, which rodeo event requires the most stamina and athletic ability? What is your favorite rodeo event?
MB: Each of the rodeo events brings its own requirements of athletic ability and stamina. The athletic ability, balance, and precision as a jockey in barrel racing; the athletic ability and stamina of a roper; the balance, stamina and athletic ability of the rough stock riders. Each one brings its challenges physically and mentally. The difference is in the contestants who put in the additional time and training to make the athletic ability, stamina and balance natural and seamless.

Of course, my favorite event would be the classic saddle bronc riding, I do like a good bucking horse but when it comes to announcing a rodeo there’s nothing like the barrel racing to pick up a crowd. They like a horse race.

GM: Working at the rodeo, you come into contact with both spectators and participants. For a person who has never seen a rodeo and who would like to attend a rodeo, which arena in the USA would you recommend?
MB: I don’t know that I have that one favorite to pick out but I do have several favorites in different parts of the country such as:
  • -      Silver Spurs Arena in Kissimmee, Florida, for producing the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo; you get to see the top contestants from each circuit there.
  • -      Buck Johnson Arena in Pecos, Texas. that has one of the oldest and among the largest arenas to compete.
  • -      Cowtown Arena in Pilesgrove Township, New Jersey, who has the oldest weekly running PRCA rodeo in the nation.
  • -      T. ED Garrison Arena in Pendleton, South Carolina, where Easy Bend Rodeo puts one of the premier rodeos of the southeast.
  • -      Nampa Idaho with the Snake River Stampede where I first met Rex Allen senior 


GM: Wow! What a list. That will a bucket list for a lot of people! I know you’ve probably seen every rodeo scenario. What are the challenges of being a Professional Rodeo Announcer?
MB: Ha-ha, keeping up with the projects at home. Staying ahead working on stats on day sheets prior to each rodeo so when I get there I can concentrate on the Production.

GM: Every Professional Rodeo Announcer has horses in the barn. What horses do you currently stable?
MB:  Whiskey is a paint quarter horse gelding that I announce rodeos on. He was previously bucking horse now turned saddle horse; a well-accomplished rope horse but still carries that bucking horse attitude. He doesn’t care for people or other horses. We’ve been a lot of miles together.

Pax is a Gruella quarter horse gelding that I used to announce from until my youngest daughter took him to compete on as a breakaway roper. Pax is a horse with a kind eye, big heart and big motor.

Gambler is a blue roan quarter horse gelding that my youngest daughter and I have started this fall. He will be a long-term project horse for my grandson. Gambler is a very smooth and balanced mover with a lot of willingness to please.

Then there’s Casper, he’s a 13-hand pony that my youngest daughter uses for a lesson horse. Great with the kids and easy to move around.  

GM: Were you hit by the recent hurricane? How has it impacted the local rodeo scene and/or your own property?
MB: We were more fortunate than many; although the eye of the hurricane made its way through our area we had minimal impact from the storm. Downed tree limbs and about five inches of rain. They say timing is everything and this was so true for the week that the hurricane passed through because it was the first weekend in a while that I was scheduled off so I didn’t have to contend with scheduling issues. There were a couple of rodeos that were rescheduled or canceled in the southeast.

GM: What does horsemanship mean to you?
MB: You know I never considered my grandfather a clinician (we didn’t know what that meant growing up) but he instilled into me to always leave the horse in better shape when you got off of him than when you got on him. Physically, mentally and emotionally.

Connect with Marvin…

Gina McKnight is a freelance writer and author from Ohio, USA. www.gmcknight.com

Photo Courtesy Lyndsey Ogle Photography