Thursday, April 29, 2021

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

My Journal: Collecting Thoughts

 


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A place to write your goals, dreams, stories, and much more! Filled with130 lined pages, each with a positive word that inspires and motivates your life. Keep writing.


Monday Creek Publishing

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Monday, April 26, 2021

Milliron Monday: Even President Kennedy... 4 26 2021


Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Another engaging article by Dr. Smith's mother, Elizabeth Cooper Saunders Smith. I believe I am missing the ending to this particular article; however, it is entertaining just the same. 

"Betty" was a prolific writer, writing for several publications at different times throughout her lifetime. An excerpt from her obituary...

Elizabeth was a longtime member of the Millbrook Garden Club for which she wrote their newsletter for many years. She also wrote a column, My Side of the Street, for the Millbrook Round Table for 12 years. In 1996, the family moved Abbott, overtaken by Parkinson's and related medical conditions, to Farmington to reside at Edgewood Manor until his death in 1998. After selling their Millbrook home, Elizabeth moved to Kingfield in 1996 to live with her daughter Susan. In addition to a short stint writing a column for the local (Kingfield, Maine) paper, The Irregular.  

From Pete's mother, Betty, My Side of the Street: Even President Kennedy borrowed material...

     The river is quiet this morning, with no appreciable change from the thunderstorms during the night. Perhaps we will get some fringe benefits from Bonnie before she passes from the scene.
     I am sure the emphasis on the weather and the Russian financial problems has been welcome in Washington, as well as to the rest of us who are weary of the domestic problems in the capitol.
     In Boston, the Globe's management problems relative to Mike Barnicle have interested me very much. On the few occasions when he appeared on Lehrer's News Hour I thought he was a breath of fresh air and that he expressed himself well - agreeing with me of course! As for borrowing material, I agree that something totally fabricated (if that is true) is wrong, but who among us has not admired a thought, phrase, or even a word, from another writer. President Kennedy among others was one of many important people who has used material from others.
     One author I would not be tempted to imitate would be James Joyce. I am astonished that his novel Ulysses was named at the top of some list as the best. Years ago when that was proscribed in the United States, Abbott acquired a limp theater edition of the book, and it has been on our shelves ever since. Several times I have attempted to read it but always lost interest within a dozen pages or so. As far as I am concerned it has no social value, and is not even well written.
     That comment probably says something about me. My choices for best novels would begin with Pride and Prejudice and list such works as Kristin Lavransdatter and Proust's mammoth Remembrance of Things Past, which took me several years to get through!
     Often the last book I've read has been the best in my mind, and that would list London by Edward Rutherfourd. At the moment I am involved in that author's previous one, Sarum. This one will overlap London a few years, but a the moment, one-third the way through, I am at 877 A.D. The town Sarum becomes the town Salisbury, and a good deal of space is given to the author's version of how the nearby Stonehenge was constructed. Here again we follow the growth and tribulations of several families.
     There were apparently many "henges" built in those early days in Britain, but this one near Salisbury is the most famous. As travelers these days know, we are not allowed close to the huge rocks laid out for astronomical knowledge, which is probably very fortunate for their preservation.
     On our junket around the U.K., we stayed at a bed and breakfast in the town, hosted by a retired army couple. I noted on a nearby house that the thatched roof had what appeared to be a pigeon on one end. The next morning it was still there, and I asked our hostess about it. She said that various thatchers left their "signature" on roofs, and that happened to be the designated trademark of that one. I looked for similar things after that, but never saw anything more of that nature. It made a good story ...
     Getting back to what we like about a book, in my case it is a bit of history mingled with biography, especially if the history looks to be fairly close to fact. Recent biographers I've read - Katharine Graham, Pamela Harriman, Ben Bradlee, and on. Mrs. Harriman's was the most interesting and factual, covering many famous people with whom Pam was intimate, so say the lest. She gave her biographer free rein and permitted him to be honest.



Have a great week ahead.


Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.


Friday, April 23, 2021

My Journal: The Masked Writer

 


NEW!

A place to write your goals, dreams, stories, and much more! Filled with 130 pages, each with a positive word that inspires and motivates your life! 
Keep writing!




Wednesday, April 21, 2021

On the Path: Reflections of a younger self by Kim W. Hunter

 


“Kim's poetry is infused with diverse experiences
 in social work, hospice, homelessness, human rights,
 HIV education and teaching.
 
On the Path: Reflections of a younger self
 
On the Path: Reflections of a younger self is a compilation of more than two dozen poems written during Mr. Hunter's younger years accompanied by narrative reflections on the inspiration for much of the poetry as he navigated early life through loss, love, abuse, and work as a bisexual and gay identified person. The heartfelt poems Kim has written are infused with the experiences of the poet's diverse background which includes counseling and social work, hospice care, homelessness, human rights advocacy, politics, HIV education, teaching in the United States and Southeast Asia, and work with people facing life challenging illnesses including cancer and hemophilia. Mr. Hunter has a passion for expressing his voice through the writing of children’s books and poetry. Kim is currently hunkered down in Cambodia during the CoViD-19 Pandemic after serving most of the past eight years as an English Teacher and Tutor with children and young adults from poor families living in the rural and mountainous areas of Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos.
 
Available in Paperback and eBook HERE!
 
Kim W. Hunter Amazon Author Page
 
Teacher Kim Amazon Author Page
 
 
 
About the Author
 
They've been a long time coming and now it's time to get the poetry, ancestry stories, and more bilingual children's books out there! (Be sure to search for my "Teacher Kim" Author Central page for a look at some simply designed journals for recording your ancestry research and preserving your own stories and memories for future generations!)

I'm currently hunkered down in Cambodia during the CoViD-19 Pandemic after teaching English most of the past 8 years in Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos. I'm from the United States and have a deep appreciation for my time in Hawai'i. My Master's Degree is in Social Work. Most of my experience is in the fields of hospice, aging, LGBT advocacy, homelessness, HIV education, teaching, and serving people facing life-challenging illnesses like cancer and hemophilia.

All sales from books help me to assist students and young people from the rural and mountainous areas of Cambodia, Laos and, hopefully soon, in the Philippines. I am extremely grateful for your support.

Kim watching the sunset in the rice fields of Cambodia

Kim out for tea with mask at the market in my village near Siem Reap
 where he is hunkered down during the pandemic.




Kim with Khmu kids in a village in Northern Laos





Monday, April 19, 2021

Milliron Monday: Taking it for Granted 4 19 2021

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

This week I am excited to share with you Grant Smith's Taking it for Granted podcast! Grant, Dr. Smith's grandson, brings an engaging podcast with amazing guests. An informed host, Grant asks the difficult questions that everyone wants to hear. Inspiring and motivating, I highly recommend listening! Connect with Grant on Facebook for updates about new podcasts!

Listen wherever podcasts are available, including iHeartRadio and Spotify.



Have a great week ahead.


Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.


Sunday, April 18, 2021

Annie Oakley: The Poem by Shane Nielsen

Deep in the Ohio woods, to bluish grey eyes espy,
The wondrous echoes of nature give their humble reply,
to the spirit of sight, and the will to try.
Billows of smoke from fires who do not cease to prier,
ventured the aptly named Little Miss Sharpshooter,
the stakes couldn't be higher.
To feed the sick and hungry, to blow away the competition,
to set all new records and rewrite the given,
No one aimed higher,
no one was more driven.

How could it be difficult?

How could sight not believe?

Skeptics and naysayers? Hard to conceive.
Bolts of lightning cast forth from the soul of the West,
struck down the greatest, struck down the best.
You can relax, even before you go far,
Aim for something in reach-"light up" a cigar.
With enough gold in trophies to fill the banks of a river,
Even Queen Victoria remembers the show you would give her.
After winning every round, with spunk and esteem,
you're worth more than a thousand words to fit in every magazine.
It isn't that that's important-it's the simple things of course.
Sitting by the gentle waters-feeding a horse.
So aim for your dreams, listen to that fire,
obey your intuition, your heart is not a liar.
Everyone, including Sitting Bull knew-that your aim was impeccable, that your heart was true.
Yes, with a heart so golden, a shell so strong,
It's no wonder you were the biggest lil legend that ever came along.
You are unique,
No need to be a replica,
Yes it is true, my dear Miss America.


About the Author:
My name is Shane Nielsen I write original fiction, fanfiction, and short stories as well as poems. Here is my motivational poem I wrote about my favorite historical figure: Annie Oakley.





Monday, April 12, 2021

Milliron Monday: My Side of the Street - April 4 12 2021

 

Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

This month we remember Dr. Smith's mother, Elizabeth Cooper Saunders Smith. "Betty" was a prolific writer, writing for several publications at different times throughout her lifetime. An excerpt from her obituary...

Elizabeth was a longtime member of the Millbrook Garden Club for which she wrote their newsletter for many years. She also wrote a column, My Side of the Street, for the Millbrook Round Table for 12 years. In 1996, the family moved Abbott, overtaken by Parkinson's and related medical conditions, to Farmington to reside at Edgewood Manor until his death in 1998. After selling their Millbrook home, Elizabeth moved to Kingfield in 1996 to live with her daughter Susan. In addition to a short stint writing a column for the local (Kingfield, Maine) paper, The Irregular.  

From Pete's mother, Betty, My Side of the Street...

A brook, nicely walled up, runs beside our house and under a little bridge to join the Carrabasset. Yesterday when the sun was warmest, a flock of blackbirds seemed to be having a group bathing party. They flew down from the tall bare trees a few at a time, and then back up to the branches to shake the water off their wings. I am not an ornithologist, but I would assume that they will wait to mate until there are leaves on the trees. And this is the time of year when I usually make my prediction, "In another couple of weeks the leaves will be out" - a statement that usually brought a laugh from my spouse.

It has been an extraordinary April so far, and people were beginning to say that we need rain. Last night Jupiter Pluvius favored us with a good soak and the river is roaring this morning. My daughter in Castle Rock, Colo., reports that they have had snow showers rather than rain. She picked some daffodils which were bending over with snow, and they perked up in the house as if grateful.

The memorable words come to mind of that great ego, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, about old soldiers, just fading away, except that old gardeners just keep on planting. I have gambled on a small planting of green beans, the ground being quite warm. Maybe that will bring back cold weather...
   
Skis on cars have been replaced by canoes, and snowmobiles by towed boats. Mainers are dyed-in-the-wool outdoor people. If all else fails, they go hiking. It makes on wonder how it is that there are more smokers in Maine than any other state.

Mr. Goldstone's speech to the National Press Club has certainly brought out an assortment of opinions on all sides. I am not nor have I ever been a smoker, but I do not understand why the tobacco business should be sued for millions by those who are. Surely if you know cigarettes are harmful you are to blame if you smoke them. If you get drunk and drive your car into a tree, should the car maker be sued? Maybe the guilty parties are the senators who kept subsidizing the tobacco farmers. It always seemed to me that those growers should be encouraged to grow other crops such as soy beans, which have so many uses.

Problems such as these go around and around. Maine will be voting again on the subject of forest users. Another related matter is the control of additional land give by Great Northern Paper to Baxter Park, given to the state by Gov. Baxter many years ago, along with a trust fund ample enough to maintain it. Mount Katahdin, the highest mountain in Maine and the beginning of the Appalachian Trail, is a treasure enjoyed by a great number of people. The three men who are the trustees of the park appear to be unduly influenced by sports groups such as Fin & Feather, and the fact that paper companies pay part of the salary of the forester member. Opening the park to snowmobiles is a tender subject, as well as hunting. Access roads would be a decided detriment to the nature of the park, as Gov. Baxter intended it to remain.

"Maine Times" has published a series of reports on the subject. One writer expresses it very well, saying that there are a great many more people who enjoy the woods and wilds who do not hunt than those who do, and that we shouldn't have to dress up like clowns to go into the woods without risking being shot.

The present time is enjoyable for a similar reason. The snow has gone enough to permit walking without being in danger of snowmobilers, and the black flies are waiting for whatever it is that black flies are awakened by, and of course there are no hunters. So I shall seize the day and Hannah and I into the woods will go - at least for a little way. We would not want to meet a black bear, thought I am sure such an encounter would not be a fatal one, the bear being more afraid of people. I don't believe that our small border collie would be interested in chasing him, either.



Have a great week ahead.



Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Family Ties by Sandra Russell

  Sandy's Grandmother Clara (c) Sandra Russell Family Ties by Sandra Russell “The best thing I can say about all this, is that familie...