Monday, February 22, 2021

Milliron Monday: Eleven Years 2 22 2021

Rhonda Curfman, Jody Smith, and Eric Curfman at Milliron Clinic 2010

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Today is the anniversary of Dr. Smith's death. I think about the many family members and clients/friends he left behind. I think about the journey of writing, the many people I met along the way who I count as friends, and most of all, spending hours with Jody, hearing about Dr. Smith and her many stories as a veterinarian's wife.

I remember the first time Pat (Dr. Smith's son), Jody and I met to talk about Dr. Smith's biography. I had a good outline but needed a book cover for inspiration. We were meeting in Pat's office when I saw the beautiful framed print (above) of Dr. Smith on his horse, Unique. It resonated as a possible book cover for Milliron. I created a mockup with the photo, and Pat agreed that was to be the cover.

The photo was taken by Rhonda and Eric Curfman of West Virginia. Jody and I traveled to the Curfman's ranch, visited with their horses and looked at the many photos of their trail rides. Rhonda and Eric are seasoned horse people - riding many miles with Dr. Smith - from backwoods to exotic trails along the equator.

The photo of Dr. Smith was taken in 2009 during a ride at Middle Mountain in West Virginia. Dr. Smith was watching a buzzard eat something dead in the valley below - the lighting was right, the scenery was set; the perfect shot for a book cover. 

The caption on the framed photo reads...

Dr. A.P. Smith was a son, a husband, a father, a grandfather, a brother, and my best friend. We followed him many times to many beautiful places. His companionship was as enjoyable as the sights we saw. Now he is leading us on our last journey and in time, when we are ready, we will be with him again in another beautiful place. 
~ Eric A. Curfman


Enjoy your journey. 
Have a great week ahead.




Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Monday, February 15, 2021

Milliron Monday: Rev. R. William Carroll 4 15 2021

Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

In remembrance of the upcoming anniversary of Dr. Smith's death, we reflect on Rev. R. William Carroll's sermon and Dr. Smith's contribution to our community, even "well beyond and indeed worldwide" ...

Pete Smith was a tower of strength. He was certainly that for his family. He was also that for this community. Pete lived in Athens County for nearly fifty years, but his influence, especially when it came to his veterinary practice, extended well beyond and indeed worldwide. The massive outpouring of support for Pete and his family shows the magnitude of his impact on so many lives - and the depth of loss we feel. What can we do when a solid rock like Pete dies? It didn't seem possible, did it? Pete was like a mountain range or a force of nature. I think most assumed he'd always be there. 

He died the way he lived -- without a safety net. The story of Pete climbing up the hill after that tree fell on him and driving home will become part of his legend. Fifty years from now, as the tales are told, he'll be bigger and stronger than Paul Bunyan. But in Pete's case, at least half the stories will be true.

Pete was so very, very tough; it's hard to remember that he was seventy-one years old. A lesser man would have stayed there in the woods and died. But Pete managed to get himself home. In fact, if some Good Samaritan had stopped to help him, Pete might well have refused. He was fiercely independent--even ornery. He was also wickedly funny and smart. At times he had to be to survive. He left home very young.

There must be something in the water up in Maine--or maybe it's the weather. Pete reminded me of lots of folks from Maine, who are some of the strongest, most independent, most determined people on earth. But Pete also called to mind the West, where he worked on ranches, met Jody, studied veterinary medicine, and rode rodeo. And he was very much identified with Athens County, where he chose to make his home.

There was a tender side to Pete. Those of us who did not know him in his personal life probably saw it best in his care for animals. I have an eleven year old daughter who is still grateful for the miracle he worked for her guinea pig. I can only imagine what miracles he worked for some of you. Here too, his legend will only grow. Pete's care for animals went beyond his consummate professionalism as a vet. With Pete, this came from a place of deep empathy. There was part of him that identified with suffering creatures in ways few of us manage for our fellow human beings. His passion for horse rescue through the Last Chance Corral speaks volumes about his priorities in life.

How deeply he will be missed--this strong and compassionate giant of a man. Again I ask us, what can we do now that Pete no longer lives among us? How do we go on now that Pete's days of cheating death are over?

In the first place, we turn to God. Pete himself often did that. The way he lived his life, he needed to rely on his faith more than most. In God, he found the One he could count on when his own strength failed. In God, he found the Almighty, who created the people, the land, and the animals he loved. In God, he found the Savior, whose love is stronger than death.

Even now this Savior - the Lord Jesus - is leading Pete by the hand into paradise. For he is the Good Shepherd, and Pete is a member of his flock. His sheep - even the ornery ones - know his voice and follow him safely home. Even in the tomb, they hear his voice and live. Through death's dark vale, they follow him into larger life.

The Lord's presence with us cannot remove our sense of loss, this "cry of absence" we feel so sharply now. But it does provide hope and strength for the days and weeks ahead.

For, in this Easter season, we remember the victory of Jesus over sin, death, and the grave. And we remember his promise - that nothing can ever, ever, ever separate us from his love.

Death is not the end--not for Pete, not for us--but is instead the gateway of eternal life.

Rev. R. William Carroll, Rector
May 22, 2010


Have a great week ahead.



Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Saturday, February 13, 2021

Anna Elizabeth Judd, Western Novelist


Anna Elizabeth Judd

About the Author

Anna provides it all as if you are in the saddle along for the journey. Her rare books bring the readers joy from nearly every genre they can appreciate. She exuberantly brings the image and sentiments of the west to full life throughout the storyline. Yet, at the core of Judd’s work is a black stallion who engages life into every aspect of the book. Haystack fills children’s mind with wonder as he interacts with Marshal Spur and the Outrider Gang, to the mild minored young steed who brings Adam to new levels of learning in his life. Then he is brilliantly portrayed as a beautiful Appaloosa stallion in the Broncobuster as Cash.

Anna Elizabeth Judd includes a vast trove of Western Novels depicting the “Cowboy Way,” Horse Whispers, Gunslingers, and the Wild West, but very few scratch the surface relative to the vibrant depictions through which Anna takes this storyline in The Hourglass of el Diablo.

In her newest edition, The Handbook of Horsemanship Ann shows her extended knowledge in the art of horse training. As she originally wrote the book for her clients, so after the training with her was complete they would have a guide to take home. It ensured their continued success in the world of horsemanship.

Anna has many other books planned in the future, so stay tuned for the next adventure of Marshal Spur and the Outlaw coming winter 2020. But…… don’t think she has left us longing…. Dive into her new music album for all the young cowboys and girls in the world. Spur Up! Marshal Spur and the Outlaw.

Websites:

thewesternnovelist.com

annaelizabethjudd.com  

Amazon Author Page

Reverb Nation Music Album 

https://www.reverbnation.com/annaelizabethjudd/song/31976038-the-hourglass

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/thewesternnovelist/

Instagram:  www.instagram.com/westernsbyjudd/

Twitter:  twitter.com/westernsbyjudd



Thursday, February 11, 2021

True Ghost Stories of First Responders By Eve S Evans / R Harrell


True Ghost Stories of First Responders
By Eve S Evans / R Harrell

A delectable variety of REAL paranormal tales you are sure to binge... First responders are those that aid us in our time of need. But have you ever wondered that some of their calls may not be classified as "typical"? Ever wondered what happens when you mix ghosts with dispatchers? How about accident sites? I know I have. That is why this book came to be. After interviewing multiple types of first responders from 911 operators to police to firemen you will read the experiences they cannot quite explain as anything less than "ghostly".

Blurb: My eyes pass over the window where I had first seen the foot and leg of the man who once lived here. From where I was standing it looked like two glowing eyes stared back at the two of us. I reached over and smacked Greg's arm. "Hey, do you see that?" He looks at me then back at the house. "What?" I point to where I'm looking. "There, in the window. It looks like two eyes." His body seems to jerk a little and I know he sees it too. We both stand there for a moment and stare, not sure what else to do.

Available in Paperback and eBook HERE!
 
About the Author
After residing in two haunted houses in her lifetime, Eve Evans is enthralled with the world of paranormal. She writes ghost stories based on true events. In 2021 she will start releasing numerous paranormal/horror novels of fictional haunted houses.
She is currently co-writing numerous books with author R Harrell and even delving into some fictional urban horror stories.

Check out her podcast for some audio ghost stories. Forever Haunted. And coming soon: The Ghosts That Haunt Me.

Eve also runs the video channel Bone-Chilling Tales.




 

The History of College Nicknames, Mascots and School Colors by Gary Hudson

 

The History of College Nicknames, Mascots and School Colors 


This book explains the history behind how colleges derived their nicknames, mascots, and school colors. Gary Hudson chose to focus the attention of his book on schools that have Division 1A Football programs, because all the athletic programs at those schools will also compete in Division 1A sports. Consequently, those schools tend to get more exposure in the media, thereby drawing more attention and curiosity to the college sports fan.

Order Here!

www.authorgaryhudson.com

 

Follow on Facebook

 

About the Author

Gary L. Hudson is an Airport Manager that has been working in the field of Aviation for the past 27 years. He graduated from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (Daytona Beach, FL) with a B.S. Degree in Aeronautical Studies, with a concentration in Airport Management. Mr. Hudson is also a licensed pilot. He was born and spent his childhood and early adult life in a small suburban town located 27 miles outside of New York City. In 1976, Mr. Hudson started following college athletics, specifically football, when his older Brother began his freshmen year at the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt). This was the same year that Pitt won the college football national championship (1976-77 season) with their star running back and Heisman Trophy winner Tony Dorsett. From that time moving forward, Mr. Hudson became very interested in wanting to know how colleges derived at their respected nicknames, mascots and school colors. So he was determined to write a book pertaining to that topic. Consequently, it wasn't until 1995, that Mr. Hudson finally decided to start pursuing his quest in finding out those answers. After many years of conducting, then postponing his research, due to other responsibilities, Mr. Hudson finally completed his book in 2019.


My Book Review:

The History of College Nicknames, Mascots and Schools Colors is an A-Z dictionary of the history behind college sports nicknames, mascots, and school colors, followed by a list of trivia questions, predominantly college football. An interesting and intriguing volume of facts, author Hudson provides adequate detail to keep the reader engaged and informed. Recommended reading for every college sports fan!


Monday, February 8, 2021

Milliron Monday: A Happy Life 2 8 2021

Jody and Dr. Smith on the trail. Photo courtesy the Smith Family archives.

Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Valentine's Day is right around the corner and I thought it would be appropriate to post a love letter Pete wrote to Jody on her birthday. The letter is included in Milliron, and I repost the letter with Jody's permission. From 1996, here's a love letter to Jody...

Dear Dear Jody,

How do I love thee? Let me count (some of) the ways! It's easy to love someone who loves you and it's mighty obvious that you do love me. Thanks for that! I do love you, too. Thanks for a wonderful sex life, comfortable homey home; good food (wonderful in fact) and a happy life. You basically raised our son and daughter with minimal help from a struggling young vet searching for success and unmindful that he already had it all!

We share a love of horses, dogs, farm, classical music, sheep, cats, "family" and each other. I really can't imagine how we could be more compatible. We have clung to and comforted each other through every kind of economic, physical, moral, mental and emotional crisis and great strength of fiber has been thereby derived. That we would travel this life together to our ends was and has and is never a serious question although it may have been darned uncomfortable at times.

We have tried on a daily basis to grow spiritually and both are happy in the Episcopal Church and I think it is wonderful we read the Bible and U-book [Urantia], Daily Word, etc., daily and pray together at home and Good Shepherd. Although not always on the same wavelength we always honor each other's views and opinions. Pretty amazing and unusual I think!

Although occasionally on both sides some have tried to break up this union it's obvious that it ain't gonna ever happen - it's toooo strong.

Happy Birthday and I look forward to sharing the rest of them with you.

Love, Pete  


Happy Valentine's Day in advance. 
Write a letter to the one you love.
Have a great week ahead.



Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

Wednesday, February 3, 2021

The Chincoteague Ponies: An interview with Gale Park Frederick

 


The Chincoteague Ponies: An interview with Gale Park Frederick
by Gina McKnight
Archived from the January 2021 Issue of Florida Equine Athlete
No duplication with permission. 
 
One of my favorite books is Misty of Chincoteague, the story of a lovely Chincoteague pony. The National Chincoteague Pony Association has been sharing their love of this amazing horse breed for over 42 years. A symbol of America’s horse-history, the Chincoteague ponies are best known for their “swim” that began in 1925. The Ponies are forced to swim across Assateague Channel – from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island – to downsize the growing herd to sustain the breed. The ponies’ natural home, Assateague Island, can only support about 150 horses. The foals are auctioned to protect and support the herd.  
 
A non-profit organization, the association was founded by Gale Park Frederick. I recently caught up with Gale and asked her about her beautiful Chincoteague ponies and her love of horses.
 
Welcome, Gale!
 
GM: Your organization is totally non-profit and helps to keep the herd safe. Are you looking for people to adopt ponies? What does it take to adopt a pony and support your organization?    
GPF: As a non-profit, every penny goes to our Chincoteague Ponies PR and upkeep. We also PR for the Chincoteague Ponies in Maryland and Virginia. We have spent 40+ letting people know about this breed and where they can get one at an auction. People from all over the world come to the Pony Penning in July each year.
 
We have home schoolers and every organization you can think of come to the farm for a day. They love it. I have seen the boys especially, take their sack lunch and eat on the bales of hay in the barn. There is magic about hay bales in a barn. The only adoption of our ponies is on paper. For one year, and generally the "adopt a pony" is a gift to someone other than the buyer. When we sell products to support the non-profit it is without sales tax. And we call it a "Donation" instead of a price.
 
GM: What is the disposition of the Chincoteague breed? Are they easier keepers than other breeds, or do they require a special stable?
GPF: Remember, they were horses shipwrecked from Spain in the 1600s. The horses were bred down to a pony size due to foliage and weather conditions, drinking salt water and only weeds to sustain them. The Chincoteague Pony never gets sick. Because of their habitat and island conditions, only the fittest survived. And they are the sweetest animal you will find in the equine world. Children do indeed have their best friend as a Chincoteague Pony. They do just fine on a weed patch and outside year round. But who does that?
 
When we purchased our 3 Chincoteague ponies in the mid 70's, they were under 13 HHs. Because of fodder and selective breeding, It took 20 years to get our Chincoteague Ponies
up to 14.2 HHs. Adults can ride them and they are an all-round Sport Pony.
 
The Chincoteague Island Firemen trucked the Chincoteague mares to an Arabian Breeding Farm in Florida, and in two years, they had the most gorgeous and tall ponies. We still have
one small mare of our 2nd generation. The rest are 14 HHs. They are nice looking and they throw big foals.
 
GM: With the cancelation of the annual pony swim due to COVID19, has the pandemic affected your non-profit and lives of the ponies?
GPF: The only way COVID19 has affected our organization and the lives of the ponies would be that no volunteers are allowed on the farm anymore. There are days in which we could have 4-5 wonderful volunteers brushing and loving on the Chincoteague Ponies. No visitors as well. The ponies miss the attention that they would get from visitors and the volunteers. We step it up with the brushing and loving. Our four are Pocket Ponies, we always have a carrot or apple in our pocket for each pony. Always be fair. They know. Chincoteague Ponies are so intelligent. Easy to train - personable and great personalities.

Sherbet Gelding. One of our babies. 
Prize Jumper in the West side of Washington State.

GM: Pocket Ponies. Adorable! The ponies have so many wonderful attributes. Describe a day in your life with the ponies…
GPF: We have nine apple trees that bare at different times, so we always have apples to give to the ponies. We also make sure the Pony Pate goes under the apple tree trees all winter. It is an amazing cycle.
 
Two times a day the ponies are fed. We watch their weight every day. Ponies really do not eat much. We make sure they have good grass hay, alfalfa and the best grain and supplement you can buy. A big salt block and fresh water and they are so happy. Our mares never did loose calcium in their teeth or bones due to pregnancies. Alfalfa has the highest calcium. We had for years a list of 5-6 foal buyers. They didn't care what color or sex. When they were next in line, they gladly took the beautiful foal. We made sure it had ground manners and they were trucked by the professional horse trucking companies all over the USA. Especially to Florida where the Native Americans bought many due to the Government lifting the law that Native Americans cannot have a horse. They are still the best customers. They did set up a breeding program in each tribe area.
 
We turn the ponies out in the winter if it is not raining. They roll and roll in the gravel and or grass. Run like the dickens and then settle down for the breakfast. They are always waiting at the gate to go back into the barn at night - winter, late fall, early spring. In summer, the ponies are out in their summer pasture, which is sectioned off for land management. The areas that have been grazed down can recover. The ponies stay out for months, watching if we get an early cold fall. Generally they are out until October of each year and go out in the spring around March or April.
 
Grooming of the ponies are not so much in the winter. We want the hair to stay on them to keep the ponies warm. We work with Nature. In the springtime, their hair comes off in handfuls. We purchase feed at the Feed Store, haul it home, and take it out to the two barns. If you are late in feeding them the P.M. feeding, they will call to you. It is like, Hey, did you forget me?
 
A day with the ponies is so much more than the above. It used to be, no two days were the same with visitors and a training being done on our farm. But days are much the same during the winter months now. We have a program and system that works and they are used to it also. They know what time it is.
 
GM: Working with the ponies day in and day out, your love for them shows. You live horsemanship! What does horsemanship mean to you?
GPF: Treat your horse and ponies like they have feelings and pride. Be the best you can be with them and they will return it over and over. Trust and Love goes hand in hand. Talk to them. They know what you are saying. And the ponies that have excelled in jumping and other sport pony arenas, everyone is so proud. But especially the pony. They stand proud and love having their picture taken.
 
Connect with Gale…
Gale Park Frederick, Founder, The National Chincoteague Pony Association
The National Chincoteague Pony Association
World's first Chincoteague Pony Registry
www.pony-chincoteague.com
www.pony-chincoteague.org
pony-pen@aol.com



Monday, February 1, 2021

Milliron Monday: An Ode to the Good Death and the Good Doctor 2 1 2021


Abbott "Pete" Smith, D.V.M.
June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010

Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Pete Smith, D.V.M., and  Milliron: Abbott “Pete” Smith, D.V.M. The Biography
 (Monday Creek Publishing 2017). A graduate of Colorado State University and a well-known veterinarian in southeast Ohio, Dr. Smith continues to motivate and inspire. 

Writing poetry can bring out emotions that we may not have the courage or ability to say, especially in the loss of a pet or loved one. Dr. Smith and his widow, Jody, have written beautiful poems about their pets. If you have read Milliron: The Biography, you will remember the passage about Jody's beloved Belgian Sheepdog, Puff. 

"My Belgian Sheepdog, Champion The Magic Dragon V Siegester (Gates of Victory) Companion Dog/Tracking Dog, also known as Puff, was so jealous of Pete. Puff was a herding and guarding dog. If you didn't have anybody to tell Puff to stop and start, he would've just started and never stop. He was Schutzhund breeding which is a line of German protection dog. Puff looked like a cross between a German Shepherd and a Collie. He was the most expensive dog I'd ever bought."

You can read more about Puff in Milliron - an amazing story of dedication and love. American Kennel Club's National Specialty Best of Winner, Puff was a favorite. Jody writes...

An Ode to the Good Death and the Good Doctor (May 1998)
(c) Jody Smith

O Puff - O Magical Dragon of a dog,
You of such grace, you with the look of eagles, now so dimmed,
Now circling, now stumbling, now falling, now unable to rise
Now immobile, now only a wagging tail as we sooth and hold you
My heart breaking with every beat, our tears falling.
You who gave me so many gifts of devotion and love and the joy of life,
Now the only gift we can give you is this love and this peace at this last kiss.

Your euthanasia shall have to be a kind of healing, the only healing we can offer now, each grateful for the ease of it.

Peace, Beloved; Peace: ease from the suffering,
Ease off to your new green meadows and sparkling streams; romp with joy and love.

Life - it goes on; go with it again, conquering, striding, Magical Puff, you of such grace and beauty, leaving behind only this empty, graying shell fading away into the leaping greenly spirits of trees.

But... tarry there - wait a heartbeat - there in your new paradise and we'll meet again, halfway across the sky in our dreams.

Farewell. Fare well. 


Have a great week ahead.



Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

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