Monday, March 27, 2023

Milliron Monday: The Sawmill

Dr. Smith at the Milliron Sawmill

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.:  June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010
Virginia Joyann "Jody" Haley Smith: April 2, 1938 - May 9, 2021
Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Milliron Farm and Clinic, Dr. Pete and Jody Smith. 

"A dream is a wish your heart makes."
― Cinderella 

There were not many times when Jody was speechless. When I asked her about Pete's sawmill, she looked into my eyes and tilted her head. She didn't have much to say about it, except that it was expensive and hard work. The sawmill is what Pete wanted to do in his golden years. I think Jody may have been thinking about traveling to far off places, or things that aging couples do. But, Pete enjoyed trees - knowing their names, feeling their bark, hearing the mammoth saw create something new. 

Today I found a CD of photos. It's titled Milliron Farm's Buckeye Beams and Mantels from an unknown photographer. I will share the photos on Milliron's Facebook sawmill album. The photos remind me of walking through the large sawmill and buildings with Jody. The smell of timber, grease, and machinery permeated the air. You can still see the buildings from Ohio State Route 550. 

Many people should be mentioned for their support of Pete and realizing his sawmill dream; people who donated their labor, skills, building materials, and moral support. The sawmill was large - they say the largest this side of the Mississippi. I don't know if that's legend or fact, but when you stood close to the large rotary saws, skidders, chains, and controls, it was impressive. 

Maybe Cinderella's quote (above) isn't appropriate for a timberman like Pete, but dreams always begin in the heart.

Dr. Smith at the control panel.



Milliron Farm Sawmill

  
Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

  

Friday, March 24, 2023

Trees by Liam Bogner

 

The lovely trees at GDC speak to me

They love me and I love them

They interest me and I interest them

We talk to each other

They are like a mother.

They take care of me.

 

The land has history.

We can remember them --

The soldiers – them

They had only the trees

They are like me.

Copyright ©Liam Bogner 2023

 

From Ohio USA, Liam Bogner is obsessed with trees. Besides trees, Liam is also interested in Civil War history, but not with the same depth of obsession as he is with trees.

From Liam’s mother: "While our family lives in Logan, Liam is currently living at Gallipolis Developmental Center (GDC) through DODD for stabilization purposes, after developing catatonia and seizures secondary to contracting COVID (despite being vaccinated 3x)."

Thank you, Liam, for sharing your beautiful poem. We send you wishes for good health. Keep writing!




Monday, March 20, 2023

Milliron Monday: Road Rage

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.:  June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010
Virginia Joyann "Jody" Haley Smith: April 2, 1938 - May 9, 2021
Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Milliron Farm and Clinic, Dr. Pete and Jody Smith. 

On the way home from Sunday church, the young Smith family encountered a crazy driver, running their car off the road. On Ohio State Route 550, that's a scary scenario - the road is particularly windy with lots of curves. At the time, the Smith's were living on Elliotsville Road, on the Taylor Property (years before Milliron Farm and Clinic).

    It was early fall, and the expectations of a calm Sunday were quickly foiledJody's notes of Pete's 1963 Road Rage tell the story...

    We were on our way home from church, followed by an aggressive driver who ran us off the road. When we arrived at the edge of our driveway, Pete ordered us out of the car; took off after the other car, returned home about a half hour later. 

    I was relieved to see he (and the car) appeared to be undamaged. I asked him, "What happened?" He replied, "Oh, further education."
    Pete explained he found what he thought was the offending car parked in a driveway off Route 56. He ran up to the house and pounded on the door, shouting for the s.o.b. who ran his family off the road. A giant of a man appeared at the door and said, "Okay, jackass, feel the hood of the car. You'll see it hasn't been driven today, but if you still want to fight, I'm ready." 
    Pete muttered an apology and came home "tail between his legs" as he described it. 

 

  
Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

  

Monday, March 13, 2023

Milliron Monday: Equine Parasitism

Dr. Smith's VIP name tags from Midwest Veterinary Conferences
 

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.:  June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010
Virginia Joyann "Jody" Haley Smith: April 2, 1938 - May 9, 2021
Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Milliron Farm and Clinic, Dr. Pete and Jody Smith. 

"Don't spread manure on pasture."
― Dr. Pete Smith

A keynote speaker at many veterinary conferences, typewritten notes fill the Smith archives. This topic is Equine Parasitism, "the most serious problem" in horse care. According to Dr. Smith's notes, "There are seventy-seven different parasites found commonly in the horse." Here are Dr. Smith's original notes...







  
Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

  

Monday, March 6, 2023

Milliron Monday: Celebration of Life Virginia Joyann Jody Smith

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, Athens, Ohio

Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.:  June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010
Virginia Joyann "Jody" Haley Smith: April 2, 1938 - May 9, 2021
Welcome to Milliron Monday where every Monday we celebrate the legacy of Milliron Farm and Clinic, Dr. Pete and Jody Smith. 

"If you should hear a fox bark on the hill -
Then turn you in your soft, smooth bed a bit,
Knowing, with shuttered eyes, the moon is bright - 
Knowing a vixen runs, alone with stars,
Down all the frosty ridges of the night."
― Return by Beulah Fenderson Smith
Frostfire: Poems of Love
  •  

Special thanks to D&R Studio, Dave Norris and Ron Mash, for capturing Jody's Memorial Service/Celebration of Life at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, Athens, Ohio, September 4, 2022:




Watching Jody's memorial and thinking... I've no one to correct my verbs, mince words, or spend long afternoons at the barn talking about Pete Smith and horses. It was the Jody Era, a time of listening, friendship, and all things Milliron. This reminds me of  a conversation I had with Jody. One day Jody and I were talking about one of her neighbors who had passed away. Jody said, "I would never say she passed away. I would say she has died." That stuck with me, I don't know why. Possibly pass away is a little kinder. But, Jody always dealt in hard facts. Die is apparent, we all know what it means. To pass away is less clear, a euphemism that helps us to process the event gradually. 

We are grateful for the outpouring of friendship and love by so many. Even now, people continue to reach out with letters of support and condolences. Sincere thanks.


  
Through captivating, powerful, and emotional anecdotes, we celebrate the life of Dr. Abbott P. Smith. His biography takes the reader from smiles to laughter to empathy and tears. Dr. Smith gave us compelling lessons learned from animals; the role animals play in the human condition, the joy of loving an animal, and the awe of their spirituality. A tender and profound look into the life of a skilled veterinarian.

  

Wednesday, March 1, 2023

True West Horsemanship: An Interview with World Equestrian Ben Longwell

 

Ben Longwell, World Equestrian - True West Horsemanship LTD

True West Horsemanship: An Interview with World Equestrian Ben Longwell
By Gina McKnight
From the February 2023 Issue of Florida Equine Athlete www.floridaequineathlete.com
No duplication without permission.
 
Our Mission is to help people and their horses better understand one another and achieve together that which they cannot do individually.
-      Ben Longwell, True West Horsemanship
 
Many times I’ve been asked, “Who is the best horse trainer you know?” And many times I have a list in my back pocket of all the trainers that I’ve interviewed. What makes a great trainer? Well, there are many factors. When I come across a horseman that promotes communication, ethics, listening skills, and a quiet approach, I know I’ve found a winner. Ben Longwell is that type of horseman. He is the proprietor of True West Horsemanship Ltd and works with riders throughout the USA and New Zealand promoting “Authentic Trust Based Horsemanship.”
 
Originally from Colorado USA, Ben has “worked for 11 years in the diverse New Zealand equine industry as a full time horse trainer and clinician, before moving back to USA in 2022. Working with all different equine disciplines and horses teaching better horsemanship and communication helping build stronger partnerships between horse and rider, has given Ben a solid versatile foundation in the equine world around the world! Ben is available to teach a variety of clinics worldwide which can suit different skill levels and interests. Participants love Ben’s knowledgeable, positive and quiet approach to teaching them. Where leaving egos behind and focusing on the horse results in true progress and a great learning environment.”
 
Welcome, Ben!
 
GM: Ben, your life sounds exciting. Born in Colorado, living and working in New Zealand, now footloose in Montana. When was your first encounter with a horse?
BL: I’m not too sure. I do distinctly remember getting run off with at age 6.
 
GM: As a horse trainer, you lean towards Natural Horsemanship. After interviewing many horse trainers from around the world, I've learned that even Natural Horsemanship has variables and trainers tweak it a bit to fit their own philosophy. What is the core knowledge of horsemanship and the most important message that every horse owner should hear?
BL: Good horsemanship has variables in application because different approaches can stem from the same principles. The best horsemanship goes beyond effectiveness to that approach which fits the horse. One of the most important thing horse owners should know is that it’s not about method, it’s about principle. And they should never stop learning!
 
GM: In 2014 you participated in New Zealand's "Kaimanawa Stallion Challenge"! What are the first steps in training a wild stallion? Was this a good experience for you?
BL: It was an awesome experience for me, though challenging, especially with some property challenges we were dealing with. I started with a blend of “taming” and laying communicational foundations to get his feet moving. He was the toughest-minded horse I’ve ever worked with so far.
 
GM: Take us through a day in your life...
BL: I work with horses and their people, whether that’s colt starting, teaching a variety of clinics or bringing folks along to experience ranch life. Our family is very close so we often ride or move cattle, travel or fix fence together.
 
GM: You've seen a lot of horses from around the world. Do you have a favorite breed?
BL: I’ve been privileged to work with a huge range of breeds and disciplines. My personal favorites are the Andalusian and Lusitano. They tend to be smart and athletic, quick but not too spooky. Of course, these Spanish types  are what the old vaqueros used in the early days of the California mission era.
 
GM: You train a lot of horses (and people!). Through the years, has there been an untrainable horse? (If so, what happens to the horse?)
BL: I have had a few that were certainly extremely slow to change and/or continued to require more skill than the owners had or could have. It’s a tough deal. Most folks decide to keep the horse for company, as opposed to trying to find a suitable home or having it put down.
 
GM: What are your thoughts about America's BLM and the wild mustangs? It seems their fate changes every four (or so) years.
BL: The mustang has been mismanaged due largely to caring people who are ignorant. It is not a native species and the extremely high numbers on the range are not only causing starvation to themselves but also to native wildlife. The extremely high numbers in captivity are costing taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars and providing a very subpar life for tens of thousands of horses.
 
GM: For sure, I want to listen to your "Life in the Saddle" podcast! You inspire and motivate many to become better in and out of the saddle. Who has been instrumental in your life to propel your success and career?
BL: God has blessed us and my wife, Natalie is amazing. My father-in-law has been instrumental in challenging us to do new things. I’ve enjoyed learning directly or indirectly from many great horsemen, especially Ray Hunt, Martin Black, Jeff Sanders and Richard Caldwell.
 
GM: Traveling the world, where in the world is your favorite place to ride?  
BL: I still prefer the northern Rockies and this is where I’m from. But I would love to ride in Spain and Mongolia.
 
GM: What advice do you have for novice riders and those looking to purchase their very first horse?
BL: Try to learn and get opinions from more than one knowledgeable source. There are a lot of loud voices out there that state opinions as facts.
 
GM: What does horsemanship mean to you?  
BL: Good horsemanship is a way of BEING around a horse that FITS the horse.
 
GM: List 5 things your fans may not know about you...
BL: 1. I trained with the Miami police as a recovery diver.
2. I’ve whitewater rafted the highest commercially rafted waterfall in the world - twice.
3. I play the guitar and fiddle.
4. I enjoy hiking, climbing and caving.
5. I’ve had stitches in my leg at a Mexican hospital.
 
Connect with Ben:
http://truewesthorsemanship.com 
https://www.facebook.com/truewesthorsemanship 
https://www.instagram.com/true_west_horsemanship 
https://www.youtube.com/cowboyandkiwigirl 
https://www.tiktok.com/@true_west_horsemanship 

Ben Longwell, World Equestrian - True West Horsemanship LTD

Ben Longwell, World Equestrian - True West Horsemanship LTD

Ben Longwell, World Equestrian - True West Horsemanship LTD


Milliron Monday: The Recordings 4

  Abbott "Pete" Smith D.V.M.:   June 16, 1938 - February 22, 2010 Virginia Joyann "Jody" Haley Smith: April 2, 1938 - Ma...